What we do

E-Serve is responsible for administering green energy and social schemes on behalf of government. These range from renewable energy incentives to energy efficiency and social programmes.

We work with energy companies, consumer groups and other stakeholders, including the UK’s elected representatives, to make sure policy targets are met in the most economical and consumer conscious way possible.

We’re also working with a growing number of delivery partners across government, adding value to their operations by sharing our expertise.

The schemes we administer

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI)

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive encourages the use of renewable heat.

The scheme is funded by HM Treasury and provides quarterly payments over seven years to homeowners who install eligible domestic renewable heat technologies. Only the owner of an eligible installation can apply for the scheme.

We’re responsible for administering this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and the Department for the Economy administers a separate domestic scheme in Northern Ireland.

Feed-in Tariff (FIT)

The Feed-in Tariff scheme encourages uptake of small-scale renewable low carbon electricity generation technologies.

The scheme requires FIT licensees (electricity suppliers) to make fixed tariff payments for electricity generated and exported to the network by accredited installations. The cost of the scheme is shared across all electricity suppliers.

Additional benefits are also available for community and school installations.

E-Serve administers this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, ensuring compliance from electricity suppliers and reporting to the Secretary of State.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The Renewables Obligation is one of the main support schemes for large-scale renewable electricity generation in the UK. It puts an obligation on licensed electricity suppliers to source a proportion of their supply from renewables.

Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs) are issued to accredited generators for the renewable electricity they generate. These are then used by electricity suppliers to demonstrate they have met their obligation. If suppliers do not have sufficient ROCs to meet their obligations they must instead pay into a ‘buy-out’ fund. Once the compliance period has closed, this fund is redistributed to compliant suppliers.

E-Serve administers this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Utility Regulator in Northern Ireland (UREGNI) through an Agency Services Agreement.

Our role is to accredit generating stations, issue certificates, ensure compliance by electricity suppliers and report annually.

Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO)

The Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO) scheme aims to promote and increase the contribution of renewable energy sources to electricity production across the EU. It provides a common platform for the trade of renewable electricity between member states.

REGOs are certificates which demonstrate electricity has been generated from renewable sources. Their primary purpose is to allow suppliers to meet the Fuel Mix Disclosure condition in their supply license. This requires suppliers to let their customers, and potential customers, know where their electricity is generated from.

E-Serve administers this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and also on behalf of UREGNI through an Agency Services Agreement.

Climate Change Levy (CCL) exemption

The Climate Change Levy (CCL) is a tax on UK business energy use, charged at the time of supply. Electricity generated from certain renewable sources before 1 August 2015 was exempt from the CCL.

E-Serve administers a certification scheme on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs, which provides evidence for the operation of this tax exemption.

Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

The Energy Company Obligation requires larger suppliers to deliver energy efficiency measures such as loft and wall insulation to domestic premises in Great Britain.

Suppliers’ obligations depend on their market share, and delivery of the obligation is market driven. Suppliers are not tied to their own customer base to meet their overall targets.

E-Serve administers this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and reports to the Secretary of State on a monthly basis.

We provide guidance to energy suppliers and those in the supply chain to help them deliver measures that comply with the requirements of the obligation.

Warm Home Discount (WHD)

The Warm Home Discount obligates energy suppliers over a certain size to provide support to vulnerable customers in Great Britain.

Most support is provided through annual electricity rebates of £140 to customers in or at risk of fuel poverty. This can include low income pensioners and families with young children. Other support is provided through a mixture of initiatives such as free energy advice and help with clearing energy debts.

E-Serve administers the scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, ensuring energy suppliers meet their obligations and reporting annual outcomes to the Secretary of State.

Government Electricity Rebate (GER)

The Government Electricity Rebate obligates electricity suppliers to provide an annual £12 rebate to all domestic electricity customers in Great Britain.

The scheme was introduced to reduce the cost of the government’s environmental programmes on consumer bills. It ran over 2014/15 and 2015/16. The rebate was made by suppliers to their customers via their normal payment method. Suppliers then submit their claims for reimbursement to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

E-Serve administers this scheme on behalf of BEIS (not including the reimbursement function), ensuring compliance by electricity suppliers and reporting to the Secretary of State.

Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR)

The Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR) is a scheme that enables eligible renewable generators to enter into a Backstop Power Purchase Agreement (BPPA) with a licensed supplier when they cannot get a standard Purchase Power Agreement through normal commercial avenues.  Eligible renewable generators will need to hold either a Contract for Difference or an Investment Contract.

E-Serve administers the scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Our role is to assess generators’ eligibility, run OLR auctions and to share the costs of the scheme fairly across all electricity suppliers.