Applying for schemes

The following information gives you a quick overview of the schemes we administer and what they’re for. For schemes you can apply for directly, we’ve provided an eligibility summary and details of how to apply. We’ve also included links to all the relevant scheme pages so you can get further details before applying.

Some of the schemes we administer are not ones you can apply for directly. They are schemes where the government has placed obligations on electricity suppliers. If this is the case we’ll make it clear how they work.

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI)

What is it?

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI) is a government incentive that could provide you with money towards renewable heating costs in your home. The types of heating you can claim for are:

  • biomass boilers and stoves
  • solar thermal, ground and air source heat pumps.

Payments are made for seven years and are based on the estimated heat demand of your home and the technology you have.

Who’s eligible?

Homeowners, including self-builders and private or social landlords in England, Scotland or Wales. However, new build properties will not normally be eligible. The only exception is if you’re building your own home.

How to apply

You’ll need to apply online but before you do so we recommend that you read more about the scheme and the eligibility criteria.

There’s also a separate RHI scheme for businesses, the public sector and non-profit organisations. If you fall into one of these categories, you’ll need to apply for the Non-Domestic RHI.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (NDRHI)

What is it?

The Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (NDRHI) is a government incentive that helps businesses, public sector and non-profit organisations in England, Scotland and Wales meet the cost of installing renewable heat technologies.

Participants receive payments over a 20-year period for eligible biomass, heat pumps (ground source, water source and air source), deep geothermal, solar thermal, biomethane and biogas and combined heat and power (CHP) installations. The payments are based on the amount of heat that is generated.

Who’s eligible?

Businesses, public sector and non-profit organisations can apply if your equipment was installed in England, Scotland or Wales on or after 15 July 2009. However, you must meet certain requirements.

How to apply

You’ll need to create an online account and provide us with information about your installation. Before you do so, we recommend that you read more about the scheme and find out if you’re eligible.

There’s also a separate RHI scheme for homeowners or private or social landlords businesses. If you fall into one of these categories, you’ll need to apply for the Domestic RHI.

Feed-in Tariff (FIT)

What is it?

The Feed-in Tariff (FIT) is a government incentive that makes it possible for you to get payments (a ‘feed-in tariff’) from your energy supplier if you generate your own electricity.

Successful applicants get a set amount for each unit (kilowatt hour or kWh) of electricity generated - a ‘generation tariff’. The rates vary depending on the size of your system, what technology you install, when your system was installed and how energy efficient your home is. You can also benefit from an ‘export tariff’ where you can sell any extra units you don’t use back to your electricity supplier.

Who’s eligible?

To be eligible for the FIT scheme, the total installed capacity of your installation must not be more than 5 MW or 2 kW for micro Combined Heat and Power (CHP). Eligible renewable and low carbon technologies are solar photovoltaic (PV), wind, hydro, anaerobic digestion and micro CHP. Installations must also be located in Great Britain and have approved metering in place.

How to apply

You can apply to get your installation accredited through one of two routes, either through the MCS-FIT route or the ROO-FIT route.

  1. MCS-FIT accreditation is for PV and wind installations with a Declared Net Capacity up to and including 50 kW and micro CHP installations with a total installed electrical capacity of up to and including 2 kW. Applications should be submitted to a FIT Licensee for accreditation. 
  2. ROO-FIT accreditation is for PV and wind installations with a Declared Net Capacity greater than 50 kW and up to and including 5 MW and all anaerobic digestion and hydro up to and including 5 MW. Applications should be submitted to us for ROO-FIT accreditation. You may want to read our account guidance document before setting up your online account on the Renewables and CHP Register.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The Renewables Obligation (RO) is one of the government’s main support schemes for large-scale renewable electricity generating stations in the UK. It places an obligation on UK electricity suppliers to source an increasing proportion of the electricity they supply from renewable sources.

Who’s eligible?

Large-scale renewable electricity generators in the UK are able to apply for accreditation under the RO. We assess applications on a case-by-case basis and will only grant accreditation if we are satisfied that the generating station meets the detailed eligibility criteria.

How to apply

To apply for accreditation under the Renewables Obligation (RO), and claim Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs), you’ll need to register for an account on the Renewables and CHP Register. Once registered you can use it to apply for accreditation, make the relevant declarations, submit monthly output data and receive or transfer their Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs).

Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO)

What is it?

The Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin scheme aims to increase the use of renewable energy sources for electricity production across the EU.

REGOs are certificates we issue to certify that electricity has been generated from eligible renewable energy sources. Their primary purpose is to allow suppliers to meet the Fuel Mix Disclosure condition in their supply license. This requires suppliers to tell their customers and potential customers how their electricity is generated.

Who’s eligible?

Operators of generating stations in Great Britain or Northern Ireland that are producing electricity from renewable energy sources are able to apply for REGO accreditation. We assess applications on a case-by-case basis and will only grant accreditation if we are satisfied that the generating station meets the detailed eligibility criteria.

How to apply

To apply for REGO accreditation you’ll need to register for an account on the Renewables and CHP Register. Once registered you can use it to apply for accreditation, sign the relevant declarations, submit output data and receive/transfer REGOs to other account holders.

Climate Change Levy (CCL) exemption

What is it?

The Climate Change Levy (CCL) is a tax on UK business energy use, charged at the time of supply. Under the CCL recipients of electricity generated from certain renewable sources before 1 August 2015 can benefit from tax exemptions. The government has closed the Climate Change Levy exemption for renewable electricity generated after 1 August 2015.

Who’s eligible?

Generating stations that generated renewable electricity before 1 August 2015 may be eligible to receive Levy Exemption Certificates (LECs) but need to be accredited first. We review and accredit applications for generating stations via the Renewables and CHP Register. We then issue LECs (Levy Exemption Certificates) on the basis of the output data provided to us by generators.

How to apply

To apply for CCL exemption accreditation you’ll need to register for an account on the Renewables and CHP Register. Once registered you can use it to apply for accreditation, sign the relevant declarations, submit monthly output data and receive/transfer Levy Exemption Certificates (LECs) to other account holders.

Warm Home Discount (WHD)

What is it?

The Warm Home Discount (WHD) obligates energy suppliers over a certain size to support vulnerable customers, such as low income pensioners and young families. It has three main elements (listed below).

Who’s eligible?

  • The Core Group helps less well-off pensioners through an automatic direct electricity bill rebate. The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and participating suppliers identify those in receipt of Pension Credit among suppliers’ customers. The majority of eligible customers are identified in this way and automatically receive a rebate of £140 each year. 
  • Suppliers must also provide an annual rebate of £140 to the Broader Group, consisting of vulnerable households in receipt of a wider range of benefits. 
  • There’s also the Industry Initiative element of the scheme where suppliers help vulnerable customers beyond giving them direct financial support. Examples include energy saving advice and assistance with reducing energy debts.

You can contact an obligated supplier to find out how they may be able to help you as part of their WHD obligations. Many of the energy suppliers’ websites explain how they can help.

Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR)

What is it?

The Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR) is a government scheme that helps eligible renewable generators enter into a Backstop Power Purchase Agreement (BPPA) with a licensed supplier when they cannot get a standard Purchase Power Agreement through normal commercial avenues.

Who’s eligible?

If you’re a renewable generator with an Investment Contract or Contracts for Difference (CFD) contract you may be eligible. We assess applications on a case-by-case basis and will only allow you to enter into a backstop power purchase agreement (BPPA) if we are satisfied that your generating station meets the detailed eligibility criteria. These can be found in our OLR: Essential Guide for Renewable Generators.

How to apply

You need to submit an expression of interest (EOI), which we will circulate to all suppliers. You will also need to submit all of the project information required including a statement of confirmation. We then begin our determination of your eligibility and we will issue an OLR notice or notice that no BPPA is to be entered into. Full details of the application process can be found in our OLR: Essential Guide for Renewable Generators.