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Chart

Source: Energylinx.

Information correct as of: April 2017

This chart compares the cheapest available tariffs offered by the six large suppliers with the cheapest tariff available in the market by payment method (direct debit, standard credit and prepayment). Figures are based on a typical domestic dual fuel customer.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Cheapest tariffs by payment method: Typical domestic dual fuel customer (GB)
DateLarge six suppliers (direct debit)Large six suppliers (standard credit)Large six suppliers (prepayment)Market (direct debit)Market (standard credit)Market (prepayment)
28/01/2012915.27976.71021.54906.56971.04969.61
28/02/2012886.18976.71021.54878.1971.04969.61
28/03/2012886.18976.71021.54878.1971.04969.61
28/04/2012895.69953.41021.54878.1953.4969.24
28/05/2012895.69953.41021.54878.1890.12969.24
28/06/2012895.69953.41021.54895.69953.41017.42
28/07/2012895.69953.41021.54875.93953.41017.42
28/08/2012899.1957.031021.54875.93957.031017.42
28/09/2012901.471020.711021.54875.93988.141017.42
28/10/2012906.171020.711069.39893.85988.141019.3
28/11/2012958.211020.711069.39909.59979.351045.64
28/12/2012990.71071.381133.19909.59979.351045.64
28/01/2013957.181037.21133.19909.59979.351045.64
28/02/2013957.181037.21133.19909.591037.21045.64
28/03/2013966.541046.571133.19909.591046.571045.64
28/04/2013966.541046.571133.19909.591046.571045.64
28/05/2013966.541046.571133.19962.43996.91045.64
28/06/2013966.541046.571133.19769.95996.91045.64
28/07/2013984.681075.511133.19769.95996.91045.64
28/08/2013971.771051.791133.19769.951051.791045.64
28/09/2013971.771051.791133.19769.951051.791045.64
28/10/20131011.81079.911133.19769.951070.991093.35
28/11/2013993.41058.151150.97769.951058.151093.35
28/12/20131033.471101.651178.61769.951101.651093.35
28/01/20141033.471101.651178.61975.211101.651172.77
28/02/20141033.971108.11178.61966.341108.11172.77
28/03/20141024.791117.271178.61964.311117.271171.39
28/04/20141000.381069.951178.61946.421069.951171.39
28/05/20141000.381069.951178.61944.551069.951171.39
28/06/20141000.381069.951170.86944.551069.951162.4
28/07/20141000.381069.951170.86944.951029.051162.4
28/08/20141000.381069.951170.86943.431038.881154.43
28/09/2014960.91030.951170.86942.271030.951154.43
28/10/2014953.41046.451170.86931.021024.451154.43
28/11/2014921.881003.791170.86914.511003.791154.43
28/12/2014916.211003.791170.86906.141003.791151.22
28/01/2015875.4945.461148.99871.26945.461148.99
28/02/2015839.28955.071148.90839.28950.351148.90
28/03/2015836.99907.241148.99836.99907.241116.99
28/04/2015834.57977.561141.64834.57950.631116.99
28/05/2015835.19905.441141.64830.56905.441116.99
28/06/2015835.71981.781122.97830.56940.901116.99
28/07/2015863.85981.781122.97830.56939.851116.99
28/08/2015876.03977.321128.54830.56940.271116.99
28/09/2015876.03963.771128.54830.56907.261100.94
28/10/2015803.00873.251128.54793.93844.041100.94
28/11/2015805.40950.751128.54787.05844.041055.61
28/12/2015850.52950.751102.20787.05844.041055.61
28/01/2016769.69839.941102.20765.00839.941055.61
28/02/2016738.38808.631092.26738.38808.631054.20
28/03/2016727.70797.761070.37727.70797.761051.22
28/04/2016723.93793.481070.37723.91793.481030.27
28/05/2016723.23877.121037.31723.23877.121017.61
28/06/2016723.23847.451037.31723.23847.45985.97
28/07/2016779.39904.971037.31758.31871.54985.97
28/08/2016801.37941.421043.54769.65871.54985.97
28/09/2016754.64839.151043.54744.30839.15985.97
28/10/2016803.54967.131043.54741.92829.42985.97
28/11/2016897.181002.631035.64790.02907.75985.97
28/12/2016951.511031.571035.64790.02923.48985.97
28/01/2017951.511031.571035.64833.71951.58985.97
28/02/2017938.011007.571032.36833.71943.99985.97
28/03/2017936.811031.321035.64833.71964.36985.97
28/04/2017938.201013.781010.42880.42962.45999.73

More information

At-a-glance summary

Direct debit customers are offered the cheapest tariffs, followed by standard credit customers and then those using prepayment meters. The gap between the cheapest tariff on standard credit and direct debit was relatively stable over 2015 and 2016 at around £100, before increasing to around £120 between November 2016 and March 2017. It fell to around £80 in April 2017.

The gap between the cheapest prepayment and direct debit tariff peaked at around £320 in March 2016. It has fallen steadily since then to around £120 in April 2017. This was due to a combination of large movements in the price of the cheapest direct debit tariffs, mostly upwards, and a relatively more stable trend in the price of the cheapest prepayment tariffs.

Please note that the prepayment tariff price cap came into effect on 1 April. 

Relevance and further information

This indicator helps us understand pricing by payment methods, as well as how much other suppliers are able to compete with the six large suppliers for each method.

Methodology

We calculate the bill values associated with the different payment methods using a ‘typical medium domestic consumer’. As of September 2015, typical domestic consumption values for a medium consumer are 12,500kWh/year for gas and 3,100kWh/year for electricity (profile class 1). The chart includes collective switching tariffs from Q1 2016.

All tariffs shown in the chart are for a dual fuel customer. Dual fuel refers to a situation where a customer takes gas and electricity from the same supplier.

Tariffs with limited availability depending on customer features (for example, tariffs which are only available to new customers, also known as ‘acquisition’ tariffs, or tariffs restricted to certain regions) are excluded from the calculation to make sure that all tariffs considered are generally available to all customers across GB.

Tariffs available with white label suppliers are included in the calculation of the cheapest tariff. White label suppliers are organisations without supply licenses that partner with an active licensed supplier to offer gas and electricity using their own brand.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem analysis of data from electricity distribution network operators (DNOs), Xoserve and the six large suppliers before 2014.

Information correct as of: March 2016

This chart shows the total number of domestic customers switching gas and electricity supplier each month. It also shows, in dotted lines, the number of switches going to medium/small suppliers, as well as the net gains made by these suppliers (from November 2016).

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Number of domestic customers switching supplier by fuel type (GB)
MonthTotal electricity switchesTotal gas switchesSwitches to small and medium sized electricity suppliersSwitches to small and medium sized gas suppliersNet gains for small and medium sized electricity suppliersNet gains for small and medium sized gas suppliers
01/01/2003326,000266,000
01/02/2003337,000167,000
01/03/2003368,000239,000
01/04/2003351,000216,000
01/05/2003327,000245,000
01/06/2003344,000252,000
01/07/2003365,000260,000
01/08/2003318,000253,000
01/09/2003382,000296,000
01/10/2003370,000290,000
01/11/2003344,000280,000
01/12/2003371,000294,000
01/01/2004273,000303,000
01/02/2004341,000256,000
01/03/2004412,000334,000
01/04/2004341,000283,000
01/05/2004310,000266,000
01/06/2004356,000297,000
01/07/2004323,000275,000
01/08/2004331,000261,000
01/09/2004367,000276,000
01/10/2004406,000338,000
01/11/2004398,000370,000
01/12/2004340,000330,000
01/01/2005243,000281,000
01/02/2005359,000181,000
01/03/2005390,000302,000
01/04/2005384,000341,000
01/05/2005369,000304,000
01/06/2005365,000317,000
01/07/2005330,000271,000
01/08/2005375,000286,000
01/09/2005348,000298,000
01/10/2005416,000301,000
01/11/2005465,000329,000
01/12/2005361,000300,000
01/01/2006284,000290,000
01/02/2006347,000208,000
01/03/2006539,000366,000
01/04/2006418,000345,000
01/05/2006396,000372,000
01/06/2006364,000350,000
01/07/2006360,000295,000
01/08/2006428,000315,000
01/09/2006402,000358,000
01/10/2006429,000356,000
01/11/2006482,000374,000
01/12/2006392,000288,000
01/01/2007352,000346,000
01/02/2007390,000265,000
01/03/2007441,000333,000
01/04/2007392,000301,000
01/05/2007452,000334,000
01/06/2007426,000378,000
01/07/2007441,000352,000
01/08/2007501,000336,000
01/09/2007397,000289,000
01/10/2007477,000383,000
01/11/2007477,000343,000
01/12/2007411,000322,000
01/01/2008335,000344,000
01/02/2008441,000278,000
01/03/2008476,000313,000
01/04/2008438,000388,000
01/05/2008440,000335,000
01/06/2008459,000347,000
01/07/2008474,000361,000
01/08/2008553,000348,000
01/09/2008466,000427,000
01/10/2008478,000347,000
01/11/2008428,000336,000
01/12/2008439,000332,000
01/01/2009290,000331,000
01/02/2009364,000255,000
01/03/2009475,000311,000
01/04/2009423,000298,000
01/05/2009397,000324,000
01/06/2009434,000332,000
01/07/2009442,000327,000
01/08/2009388,000304,000
01/09/2009480,000343,000
01/10/2009455,000336,000
01/11/2009441,000330,000
01/12/2009438,000332,000
01/01/2010259,000307,0006622
01/02/2010353,000217,0008884
01/03/2010460,000316,0007735
01/04/2010379,000307,0009193
01/05/2010352,000271,0007564
01/06/2010413,000289,0002986
01/07/2010398,000292,0003007
01/08/2010419,000296,0003928
01/09/2010426,000305,0006836
01/10/2010409,000305,0004253
01/11/2010456,000322,00010827
01/12/2010425,000328,00011251
01/01/2011270,000279,0003280
01/02/2011324,000211,0006340
01/03/2011400,000307,0006597
01/04/2011360,000246,0004273
01/05/2011356,000308,0007479
01/06/2011393,000259,0008895
01/07/2011397,000301,0008868
01/08/2011449,000343,00016021
01/09/2011343,000309,00013281
01/10/2011326,000247,00019478
01/11/2011329,000240,00019854
01/12/2011259,000219,00012620
01/01/2012210,000194,00022337
01/02/2012257,000149,00029128
01/03/2012279,000190,00020817
01/04/2012232,000176,00012872
01/05/2012286,000202,00019167
01/06/2012272,000192,00041228
01/07/2012257,000190,00018762
01/08/2012265,000187,00013366
01/09/2012312,000195,00022,561
01/10/2012366,000273,00072,968
01/11/2012338,000174,00066,652
01/12/2012266,000159,00050,393
01/01/2013228,000157,92943,231
01/02/2013247,000117,96449,082
01/03/2013247,000144,21329,156
01/04/2013251,000186,69029,311
01/05/2013234,000155,03124,985
01/06/2013218,000148,45335,281
01/07/2013232,000160,79331,292
01/08/2013210,000140,74932,638
01/09/2013254,000145,41427,969
01/10/2013381,186213,58971,447
01/11/2013606,061358,799138,394
01/12/2013309,978260,32593,626
01/01/2014214,944188,87093,57973,618
01/02/2014253,295169,946106,70877,109
01/03/2014269,497195,773134,80292,080
01/04/2014252,047201,512133,319104,617
01/05/2014228,628179,604124,802100,417
01/06/2014201,381163,56898,58687,363
01/07/2014219,026145,714104,62573,414
01/08/2014223,581150,623113,96076,153
01/09/2014283,877180,965138,186102,117
01/10/2014309,890232,178118,527108,942
01/11/2014270,603216,783108,79388,088
01/12/2014311,298250,638103,86781,917
01/01/2015190,554155,78973,97758,597
01/02/2015291,341230,518102,44590,566
01/03/2015382,809304,679135,965103,196
01/04/2015272,996214,556108,97679,892
01/05/2015239,574197,166108,49988,984
01/06/2015229,825174,688105,81483,896
01/07/2015239,343192,299108,28786,631
01/08/2015253,099195,183116,63393,783
01/09/2015279,411223,703128,043100,534
01/10/2015349,278274,581161,602121,335
01/11/2015343,870274,206161,034131,736
01/12/2015310,293242,630148,668117,677
01/01/2016245,922189,143139,539109,708
01/02/2016390,645305,057176,036143,238
01/03/2016453,964361,399244,232196,273
01/04/2016386,456273,751204,748151,645
01/05/2016345,146261,324169,711127,352
01/06/2016335,879252,712143,231104,674
01/07/2016303,404221,175140,898103,662
01/08/2016310,132209,178149,026108,997
01/09/2016349,203271,374154,142116,032
01/10/2016486,878384,023150,747118,328
01/11/2016386,585297,468147,607116,24536,64423,680
01/12/2016423,068317,74091,05368,890
01/01/2017319,503239,75997,49678,267
01/02/2017398,150296,055107,16787,624
01/03/2017512,855388,103142,155113,040

More information

At-a-glance summary

The number of domestic gas and electricity customers switching supplier generally follows a seasonal pattern (with peaks around March and November then dipping in January and the summer months). Switching declined significantly from 2008 to 2012, and then levelled out. It has been on the rise since 2014 and the number of domestic switches in the year up to the end of March 2017 has been 26% higher than in the 12 preceding months for electricity and 20% higher for gas. There was a significant increase in electricity switches to over 510,000 in March 2017, 13% higher than in March 2016.  It is the highest observed number of electricity switches for the month of March since 2006. The number of gas switches in March was 388,000, the highest monthly switching level since September 2008.

In March 2017, the net switching gains for small and medium suppliers stood at around 142,000 and 113,000 meter points for electricity and gas respectively, showing that more people are switching away from the six large suppliers. This continues the trend of increasing switches to smaller suppliers since Q4 2016.

Relevance and further information

External switching, from one supplier to another, is one measure of consumer engagement with the market. The number of switches to small and medium sized suppliers show how these suppliers are attracting customers over time.

Methodology

The number of customers switching supplier shown in the graph is based on the number of meter points a supplier gains from another following a customer choice to change their supplier.

The net gains for small and medium suppliers is calculated by subtracting from the gross meter point gains these suppliers achieve over the month the gross number of meter points these suppliers lose over the same period.

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Chart

Source: Energylinx.

Information correct as of: April 2017

This chart shows trends in domestic energy bills by tariff offered by the six large suppliers and other suppliers. It compares their average standard variable tariffs with the cheapest tariffs available in the market (including white label tariffs). Figures are based on a typical domestic dual fuel customer paying by direct debit. 

This information should not be used as a price comparison tool. To find out about accredited price comparison sites, see the Citizens Advice energy shopping guide

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Retail price comparison by company and tariff type: Domestic (GB)
DateAverage standard variable tariff (Six large suppliers)Average standard variable tariff (Other suppliers)Cheapest tariff (Six large suppliers)Cheapest tariff (All suppliers)Cheapest tariff (Basket)
28/01/20121020.161026.33915.27906.56947.56
28/02/20121000.761019.41886.18878.10930.29
28/03/2012997.251019.41886.18878.10936.54
28/04/2012997.251019.35895.69878.10937.68
28/05/2012997.251019.35895.69878.10929.78
28/06/2012997.251036.16895.69895.69945.53
28/07/2012997.251034.16895.69875.93928.99
28/08/2012997.251032.02899.10875.93924.85
28/09/2012997.251019.84901.47875.93931.04
28/10/20121009.001022.51906.17893.85956.00
28/11/20121030.781046.91958.21909.59997.71
28/12/20121061.801089.65990.70909.59994.59
28/01/20131074.421089.65957.18909.59990.81
28/02/20131074.421103.04957.18909.59994.56
28/03/20131074.421103.04966.54909.59995.50
28/04/20131074.421115.23966.54909.59988.37
28/05/20131074.431115.23966.54962.43997.77
28/06/20131074.431115.23966.54769.95967.26
28/07/20131074.451115.23984.68769.95974.82
28/08/20131074.451115.23971.77769.95988.47
28/09/20131074.451115.23971.77769.95979.55
28/10/20131074.451129.021011.80769.95995.67
28/11/20131105.941133.08993.40769.95992.26
28/12/20131138.951133.081033.47769.95997.00
28/01/20141145.841134.251033.47975.211013.73
28/02/20141134.091139.371033.97966.341014.19
28/03/20141128.101136.041024.79964.311016.25
28/04/20141128.101139.051000.38946.42995.26
28/05/20141128.101139.051000.38944.55995.13
28/06/20141128.101139.051000.38944.55992.88
28/07/20141128.101142.671000.38944.95976.39
28/08/20141128.101140.961000.38943.43978.98
28/09/20141128.101171.97960.90942.27972.34
28/10/20141128.101145.38953.40931.02960.15
28/11/20141128.101145.38921.88914.51947.94
28/12/20141128.101144.09916.21906.14929.69
28/01/20151124.331144.09875.40871.26895.39
28/02/20151106.651110.84839.28839.28881.39
28/03/20151106.651088.31836.99836.99892.38
28/04/20151106.651075.32834.57834.57878.56
28/05/20151102.281073.26835.19830.56877.12
28/06/20151102.281073.26835.71830.56871.21
28/07/20151102.281066.77863.85830.56867.88
28/08/20151098.031066.77876.03830.56868.79
28/09/20151098.031054.98876.03830.56858.62
28/10/20151098.031050.12803.00793.93823.00
28/11/20151098.031040.70805.40787.05810.84
28/12/20151098.031039.03850.52787.05803.86
28/01/20161098.031035.48769.69765.00785.04
28/02/20161092.691020.06738.38738.38755.65
28/03/20161071.441013.00727.70727.70756.05
28/04/20161065.97978.55723.91723.91751.58
28/05/20161065.97976.04723.23723.23742.71
28/06/20161065.97984.02723.23723.23751.36
28/07/20161065.97988.70779.39758.31779.72
28/08/20161065.97983.86801.37769.65789.25
28/09/20161065.97983.89754.64744.30777.00
28/10/20161065.97994.93803.54741.92786.41
28/11/20161065.971012.84897.18790.02859.23
28/12/20161065.971019.72951.51790.02872.16
28/01/20171061.061020.10951.51833.71881.11
28/02/20171061.061034.48938.01833.71876.52
28/03/20171086.311038.66936.81833.71875.30
28/04/20171129.071055.29938.20880.42889.92

More information

At-a-glance summary

From the start of 2014 until early 2016, the price difference between the average standard variable tariff and the cheapest tariff available in the market increased significantly. This is because the price of the cheapest tariffs fell at a much faster rate than that of the average standard variable tariff. The differential peaked in February 2016 at £350. Since then, the cheapest tariff in the market and the cheapest offered by the six large suppliers have increased by around 19% and 27% respectively, driven primarily by increases in wholesale prices.

The average price of SVTs offered by the six large suppliers increased throughout March and April, reaching £1,129 at the end of April. This is the first round of increases in SVT prices, concerning most of these suppliers, since the end of 2013. The differential between the average price of the SVT offered by the six largest suppliers and the cheapest tariff in the market reached a two-year low of £230 in February 2017, but has been at £250 in March and April, despite a 6% increase in the price of the cheapest tariff, as a result of the increase in the price of SVTs.

The differential between the basket of cheapest tariffs and the average standard variable tariff for the six large suppliers stood at around £240 in April, an increase of 13% over the previous month.

Relevance and further information

Tariff differentials reflect pricing in different market segments, as well as how much other suppliers are able to compete on price with the six large suppliers.

Methodology

We calculate the bill values associated with the different tariff types using a ‘typical medium domestic consumer’. As of September 2015, typical consumption values for a medium consumer are 12,500kWh/year for gas and 3,100kWh/year for electricity (profile class 1). The chart includes collective switching tariffs from Q1 2016. All tariffs shown in the chart are for a dual fuel, direct debit customer.

Dual fuel refers to a situation where a customer takes gas and electricity from the same supplier.

A standard variable tariff refers to a supply contract which is for a period of an indefinite length and which does not contain a fixed term period that applies to any of the terms and conditions. It’s an energy supplier’s basic offer. If a customer does not choose a specific energy plan, for example after their fixed tariff ends, they will be moved on a standard variable tariff until they have chosen a new one. A customer can also make an active choice to select a standard variable tariff.

Tariffs with limited availability depending on customer features (for example, tariffs which are only available to new customers, also known as ‘acquisition’ tariffs, or tariffs restricted to certain regions) are excluded from the calculation to make sure that all tariffs considered are generally available to all customers across GB.

Tariffs available with white label suppliers are included in the calculation of the cheapest tariffs. White label suppliers are organisations without supply licenses that partner with an active licensed supplier to offer gas and electricity using their own brand.

To calculate the average of the cheapest tariffs from the ten cheapest suppliers we took the cheapest tariff offered by each supplier in the market (i.e. one tariff per supplier) and then ranked the tariffs in order of price. We then took the simple average of the ten cheapest tariffs in this list. This method is to ensure a cross section of suppliers is included in the calculation.

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Expenditure vs allowance: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1).

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart compares gas distribution companies’ realised total expenditure for their regulated business activities against their allowance for the three completed years of the RIIO-GD1 network price control.

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Expenditure vs allowance: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1)
Network companyYear 1 expenditureYear 1 allowanceYear 2 expenditureYear 2 allowanceYear 3 expenditureYear 3 allowance
Cadent (East of England)308.8333.8303.4320.5300.4316.3
Cadent (London)243.4284224285240.1302.6
Cadent (North West)227.1256.9257.5243.1228.2235.2
Cadent (West Midlands)165.8191.5154.6191.4174.3184.7
Northern Gas Networks215.6250.8229.7258.1227.3261.3
Scotia Gas Networks (Scotland)148.2210.1170.3202.3165196.4
Scotia Gas Networks (Southern)322.4431.1338410.8336.4410.6
Wales & West Utilities223.1263.3212.7258.2208.9254.5

More information

Expenditure vs allowance: At-a-glance summary

  • Gas distribution network owners forecast that they will outperform their cost allowances over the eight years of RIIO-GD1 by 12.3%.
  • Cost savings are shared with consumers, which help keep down the network costs part of an energy bill.

Relevance and further information

  • This chart is an indicator of company financial performance against cost allowances for the three completed years of the RIIO-GD1 price control period.
  • We set the total amount each company can spend ahead of the price control (company ‘allowances’) and monitor their actual spend (‘total expenditure’) against these amounts annually.
  • The expenditure shown only accounts for controllable total expenditure.
  • Network companies are allowed to retain a part of any savings they achieve, with the rest being passed on to consumers.

Methodology

Each year, network companies must report on their performance under the RIIO-GD1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on network company performance. 

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Javascript is required to render chart Return on regulatory equity: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1).

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of financial performance. It shows our estimates of gas distribution network owners’ return on regulatory equity (RoRE). It is our current view of an eight-year average RoRE over RIIO-GD1.

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - distribution
  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Return on regulatory equity: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1)
Current eight-year view
Cadent9.78%
Northern Gas Networks11.23%
Scotia Gas Networks11.61%
Wales & West Utilities11.31%

More information

Return on regulatory equity (RoRE): At-a-glance summary

  • RoRE across the gas distribution sector is 10.64%
  • It ranges from 11.61% for Scotia Gas Networks to 9.78% for Cadent.
  • The baseline is 6.7%.

Relevance and further information

  • RoRE helps us monitor the financial performance of network companies under the price control.
  • RoRE should be compared to the cost of equity allowed at the start of the price control. For all gas distribution owners, this was 6.7%
  • No gas distribution owners are forecast to earn returns below their cost of equity.

Methodology

  • Our RoRE calculation is based on a mix of the first three years’ performance, company forecasts and simple averages.
  • There are a number of factors not reflected in our RoRE calculations which may impact the return realised by shareholders. The largest being potential clawbacks for non-delivery of outputs.
  • Our calculation assumes all outputs will be delivered. Returns may not equal the actual returns seen by shareholders.
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Javascript is required to render chart Volume of gas lost from the distribution network (RIIO-GD1).

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of company performance on environmental impact. It shows the annual volume of gas lost (referred to as ‘shrinkage’) by gas distribution network owners. Shrinkage is the dominant element of network owners’ business carbon footprint.

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Volume of gas lost from the distribution network (RIIO-GD1)
Year 1 target (2013/14)Year 1 actual (2013/14)Year 2 target (2014/15)Year 2 actual (2014/15)Year 3 target (2015/16)Year 3 actual (2015/16)
Cadent162814181498137414601374
Northern Gas Networks459417445397432382
Scotia Gas Networks884825848785826766
Wales & West Utilities440417429414421381

More information

Volume of gas lost from the distribution network: At-a-glance summary

All gas distribution network owners are meeting their annual volume of gas lost ('shrinkage') targets and forecast to meet them for the rest of the RIIO-GD1 price control period. 

Relevance and further information

Under the RIIO-GD1 price control, we expect companies to reduce their environmental impact, including reducing the amount of shrinkage from their networks.

We incentivise gas distribution companies to minimise shrinkage through two mechanisms, the:

  • Environmental Emissions Incentive
  • Shrinkage Incentive.

Shrinkage targets were updated in 2014/15 following an update of the model used. We have therefore revised the 2013/14 figures to make them relative to the new targets.  

Methodology

Each year, network companies must report on their performance under the RIIO-GD1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on network company performance.

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Javascript is required to render chart Risk removed from the network: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1).

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of network safety. Due to their nature, gas networks pose a safety risk. We set targets for gas distribution network owners to reduce the safety risk on their networks. The chart shows the level of safety risk network owners have removed by replacing or abandoning iron gas mains over the three completed years of the RIIO-GD1 price control.

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Risk removed from the network: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1)
Expected risk reductionActual risk reduction
Cadent217751318763
Northern Gas Networks41697114225
Scotia Gas Networks68087152364
Wales & West Utilities3702365756

More information

Risk removed from the network: At-a-glance summary

At this stage of the price control, all four gas distribution companies expect to exceed their targets and are currently removing more risk than might be expected. 

Relevance and further information

Network risk is the risk of an incident occurring on the gas distribution network. Gas distribution networks must remove a certain level of risk from their networks in RIIO-GD1 and they use a model to identify this risk.  

ll network owners explain that they are targeting higher risk mains first as a way to achieve this output early. As a consequence, since the start of the RIIO-GD1 price control, the iron mains risk across the distribution networks has reduced by 0.69 incidents per year from the original start position of 2.52 incidents per year. 

Methodology

Each year, network companies must report on their performance under the RIIO-GD1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on network company performance.

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Javascript is required to render chart Network availability: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1).

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of network availability. It shows the gas distribution network availability as a percentage over the three completed years of the RIIO-GD1 price control. Availability for 2015/16 has been consistently 99.998 for GB customers. You can see how this breaks down by network owner in the table below.

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Cadent

99.997%

99.997%

99.996%

Northern Gas Networks

99.998%

99.998%

99.998%

Scotia Gas Networks

99.997%

99.998%

99.998%

Wales & West Utilities

99.999%

99.998%

99.999%

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Network availability: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1)
Year 1 (2013-14)Year 2 (2014-15)Year 3 (2015-16)
Cadent99.997%99.997%99.996%
NGN99.998%99.998%99.998%
SGN99.997%99.998%99.998%
WWU99.999%99.998%99.999%

More information

Network availability: At-a-glance summary

Network availability (availability of supply) to GB consumers was 99.998% in 2015-16 and has been consistent over the RIIO-GD1 period so far.   

Relevance and further information

  • Network availability is the time (as a % of total time during that period) that the GD network is available to consumers.
  • Network availability accounts for both planned and unplanned interruptions. 

Methodology

Each year, network companies must report on their performance under the RIIO-GD1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on network company performance.

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Chart

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of customer satisfaction with gas distribution companies under the RIIO-GD1 price control. It shows three scores comprising customer satisfaction over the three completed years of the price control.

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Customer satisfaction with network owners: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1)
Year 1 stakeholder engagement incentive reward scoreYear 2 stakeholder engagement incentive reward scoreYear 3 stakeholder engagement incentive reward scoreYear 1 average customer survey scoreYear 2 average customer survey scoreYear 3 average customer survey score
Cadent7.155.96.98.158.238.36
Northern Gas Networks6.755.56.88.759.019.17
SGN6.056.45.758.648.728.98
Wales & West Utilities6.37.056.058.699.049.05

More information

Customer satisfaction with network owners: At-a-glance summary

  • Average industry performance for customer satisfaction has continued to increase and most gas distribution network owners improved on their average score from last year.
  • Northern Gas Networks achieved the highest average score in 2015-16 and has the highest average customer satisfaction in RIIO-GD1 so far.
  • Cadent has been penalised for failure to meet their targets in two of the three satisfaction scoring categories (planned work and connections). All other companies are meeting targets and earning financial rewards.

Relevance and further information

We want gas distribution companies to understand consumers’ needs and proactively engage with them to make sure these are met.

Customer satisfaction is measured annually across three categories:

  • planned work
  • unplanned work and
  • connections work.

We set targets for customer satisfaction, with associated penalties and rewards, based on how well gas distribution owners perform in each category.

Methodology

Each year, gas distribution network owners must report on their performance under the RIIO-GD1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on network company performance.

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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the total number of complaints received by the six large energy suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts per quarter over the period Q1 2013 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by the six large suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts
QuarterBritish GasEDF energyE.ONnpowerScottishPowerSSE
Q1 20132,2957,7843,1704,9181,5191,376
Q2 20131,6965,9463,3205,6261,6111,532
Q3 20131,5824,6462,9366,8671,3301,335
Q4 20132,4124,2283,2258,0131,3991,686
Q1 20143,0844,6143,7588,3031,3572,760
Q2 20142,8445,0113,9216,8901,6483,081
Q3 20142,7254,2763,4826,2582,0312,985
Q4 20142,8515,3413,3526,5682,0692,813
Q1 20153,0514,1083,6955,6352,6483,474
Q2 20152,5072,7123,2373,3382,7203,357
Q3 20152,1412,6392,5392,8982,7193,475
Q4 20151,7142,3842,0802,0952,4122,594
Q1 20161,8662,5062,0391,6742,2121,751
Q2 20161,5742,5331,7202,0562,3181,665
Q3 20161,5182,3531,6431,6052,2521,577
Q4 20161,5552,2231,8391,8742,4421,598
Q1 20171,4632,4382,2502,2002,4931,929
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Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the total number of complaints received by the medium-sized energy suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts per quarter over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by medium-sized suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts
Quarter/YearCo-OperativeFirst UtilityOvoUtilitaUtility WarehouseExtra Energy
Q1 20143491,1821,3451,2241,949
Q2 20144869568393601,84511
Q3 20144179496494471,77246
Q4 20142479786311,2142,117188
Q1 20152841,2276891,2382,711569
Q2 20155481,0696257031,611618
Q3 20151,2701,2125797271,322759
Q4 20151,0691,0921641,4671,9921,190
Q1 20161,2231,3541462,3792,7691,121
Q2 20168401,0021124,6522,007655
Q3 20166561,091803,3681,785820
Q4 20165631,479783,8401,3852,404
Q1 20176912,052795,6851,0733,708
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