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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: November 2016

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by small and medium sized energy suppliers within eight weeks from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2014 to Q3 2016.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by independent suppliers within eight weeks (%)
Quarter/YearCo-opFirst UtilityOvoSpark EnergyUtilitaUtility WarehouseEcotricity
Q1 2014989199999999100
Q2 2014998199989999100
Q3 2014987499999999100
Q4 20149978959999100100
Q1 20159881969999100100
Q2 20159385999699100100
Q3 20159084999710097100
Q4 20159380999910098100
Q1 2016918096999999100
Q2 201694849799999795
Q3 2016818897991009894
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Chart

Source: RIIO electricity distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of financial performance. It compares electricity distribution operators’ realised total expenditure for their regulated business activities against their allowance for the first year of the RIIO-ED1 network price control.

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - distribution

Data Table

Expenditure vs allowance: Electricity distribution (RIIO-ED1)
Distribution network operatorsYear 1 expenditureYear 1 allowance
Electricity North West244251
Northern Powergrid436450
Western Power Distribution985961
UK Power Networks643851
SP Energy Networks431467
Scottish & Southern Electricity Networks427495

More information

Expenditure vs allowance: At-a-glance summary

  • Five of the six distribution network operator groups underspent their allowances.
  • Underspend was greatest for UK Power Networks.
  • Only Western Power Distribution overspent on its allowances.

Relevance and further information

  • This chart is an indicator of company financial performance against cost allowances for the first year of the RIIO-ED1 price control period.
  • We set the total amount each company can spend ahead of the price control (company ‘allowances’) and monitor their actual spend (‘total expenditure’) against these amounts annually.
  • Network companies are allowed to retain a part of any savings achieved, with the rest being passed on to consumers.

Methodology

Each year, distribution network operators must report on their performance under the RIIO-ED1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on distribution network operator financial performance. 

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Customer satisfaction: Six large electricity suppliers.

Source: GfK.

Information correct as of: September 2016

We expect certain things from our energy suppliers, like being able to contact them when we need to and clear utility bills we can understand. You can use this chart to compare how the six large electricity suppliers perform on these, alongside other customer satisfaction measures. The data comes from the GfK Energy Research Panel and covers the period between July and September 2016.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Customer satisfaction: Six large electricity suppliers
CategoryBritish GasEDFE.ONnpowerScottishPowerSSE
Satisfied with supplier service51%53%55%44%48%56%
Satisfied with understandable bills51%56%54%52%53%55%
Satisfied with ease of contacting supplier67%77%65%64%63%86%
Would recommend supplier37%38%38%27%35%42%
Agree supplier values its customers33%34%36%26%29%35%

More information

Methodology

This data comes from the GfK Energy Research Panel. It’s a semi-continuous, nationally representative panel of 10,000 homes in Great Britain. The panel provides ongoing satisfaction and switching information. The data is not for commercial use. 

Customers were asked the question 'How satisfied are you with the service you get from your current supplier?’

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Customer satisfaction: Six large gas suppliers.

Source: GfK.

Information correct as of: September 2016

We expect certain things from our energy suppliers, like being able to contact them when we need to and clear utility bills we can understand. You can use this chart to compare how the six large electricity suppliers perform on these, alongside other customer satisfaction measures. The data comes from the GfK Energy Research Panel and covers the period between July and September 2016.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Customer satisfaction: Six large gas suppliers
CategoryBritish GasEDFE.ONnpowerScottishPowerSSE
Satisfied with supplier service50%57%56%47%49%56%
Satisfied with understandable bills51%59%57%51%56%52%
Satisfied with ease of contacting supplier69%72%77%63%71%90%
Would recommend supplier34%43%41%29%36%42%
Agree supplier values its customers31%38%38%28%31%35%

More information

Methodology

This data comes from the GfK Energy Research Panel. It’s a semi-continuous, nationally representative panel of 10,000 homes in Great Britain. The panel provides ongoing satisfaction and switching information. The data is not for commercial use. 

Customers were asked the question 'How satisfied are you with the service you get from your current supplier?’

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Chart

Source: GfK Energy Research Panel.

Information correct as of: June 2016

This chart shows quarterly customer satisfaction trends for gas and electricity suppliers in Great Britain. It is based on an aggregate of those reporting being ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with the service they receive from their supplier. 

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Energy customers satisfied or very satisfied with their supplier's services (GB)
Quarter EndingElectricityGas
30/06/201059%59%
30/09/201058%58%
31/12/201056%55%
31/03/201157%56%
30/06/201154%56%
30/09/201152%52%
31/12/201150%50%
31/03/201249%49%
30/06/201250%51%
30/09/201251%52%
31/12/201250%50%
31/03/201352%54%
30/06/201351%52%
30/09/201351%52%
31/12/201349%50%
31/03/201450%50%
30/06/201449%50%
30/09/201450%50%
31/12/201450%50%
31/03/201551%51%
30/06/201551%52%
30/09/201551%52%
30/12/201552%52%
31/03/201652%52%
31/06/201653%53%

More information

At-a-glance summary

Between 2010 and 2011 the proportion of satisfied and very satisfied customers fell from around 60 to 50 per cent. Thereafter satisfaction has remained broadly stable at around 50%, edging up slightly since 2014 and reaching 53% in Q2 2016.

Relevance and further information

Levels of customer satisfaction give a general indication of how well the market is working, from the viewpoint of the customer. This can help us understand levels of market engagement.

Methodology

This chart is based on the responses to a consumer survey by the GfK Energy Research Panel. The panel is based on a large sample size (10,000 customers), updated every quarter, and has been running since 2010.

Customers were asked the question 'How satisfied are you with the service you get from your current supplier?’. The question was asked separately for gas and electricity.

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Chart

Source: Social Obligations Report.

Information correct as of: September 2016

This chart shows the average number of weeks repay by customers who had a domestic gas prepayment meter (PPM) installed to repay debt during the period between April 2015 and March 2016 (Q2 2015 – Q1 2016).

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Gas PPM customers: Average length of debt repayment plans agreed (GB)
SupplierAverage length of debt repayment arrangements agreed for PPM customers (gas), Q2 2015 - Q1 2016
Spark Energy439
EDF Energy186
Good Energy146
SSE130
Ovo Energy123
First Utility120
Co-operative Energy119
Utility Warehouse119
Ecotricity118
ScottishPower118
npower110
E.ON106
British Gas95
Zog Energy65
Utilita36

More information

At–a-glance summary

This chart shows the average number of weeks repay by customers who had a domestic gas PPM installed to repay debt during the period between April 2015 and March 2016 (Q2 2015 – Q1 2016). The average number of weeks that customers were given to repay their debt ranged from 36 to 439 weeks.

Note: Only suppliers who had PPM customers repaying a debt during at least one of the four quarters are shown on the graph. For each supplier shown on the graph, we have calculated a weighted average of the last four quarters based on the total number of new PPMs installed for debt for each supplier in the four quarters.

Relevance

Suppliers must offer the customer an option to pay for their electricity and gas through a PPM to recover debt where it is safe and reasonably practicable in all circumstances for the customer to do so.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem analysis of data from electricity distribution network operators (DNOs), Xoserve and the six large suppliers before 2014.

Information correct as of: November 2016

This chart shows the total number of domestic customers switching gas and electricity supplier each month. It also shows, in dotted lines, the number of switches going to medium/small suppliers, as well as the net gains made by these suppliers (from November 2016).

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Number of domestic customers switching supplier by fuel type (GB)
MonthTotal electricity switchesTotal gas switchesSwitches to small and medium sized electricity suppliersSwitches to small and medium sized gas suppliersNet gains for small and medium sized electricity suppliersNet gains for small and medium sized gas suppliers
01/01/2003326,000266,000
01/02/2003337,000167,000
01/03/2003368,000239,000
01/04/2003351,000216,000
01/05/2003327,000245,000
01/06/2003344,000252,000
01/07/2003365,000260,000
01/08/2003318,000253,000
01/09/2003382,000296,000
01/10/2003370,000290,000
01/11/2003344,000280,000
01/12/2003371,000294,000
01/01/2004273,000303,000
01/02/2004341,000256,000
01/03/2004412,000334,000
01/04/2004341,000283,000
01/05/2004310,000266,000
01/06/2004356,000297,000
01/07/2004323,000275,000
01/08/2004331,000261,000
01/09/2004367,000276,000
01/10/2004406,000338,000
01/11/2004398,000370,000
01/12/2004340,000330,000
01/01/2005243,000281,000
01/02/2005359,000181,000
01/03/2005390,000302,000
01/04/2005384,000341,000
01/05/2005369,000304,000
01/06/2005365,000317,000
01/07/2005330,000271,000
01/08/2005375,000286,000
01/09/2005348,000298,000
01/10/2005416,000301,000
01/11/2005465,000329,000
01/12/2005361,000300,000
01/01/2006284,000290,000
01/02/2006347,000208,000
01/03/2006539,000366,000
01/04/2006418,000345,000
01/05/2006396,000372,000
01/06/2006364,000350,000
01/07/2006360,000295,000
01/08/2006428,000315,000
01/09/2006402,000358,000
01/10/2006429,000356,000
01/11/2006482,000374,000
01/12/2006392,000288,000
01/01/2007352,000346,000
01/02/2007390,000265,000
01/03/2007441,000333,000
01/04/2007392,000301,000
01/05/2007452,000334,000
01/06/2007426,000378,000
01/07/2007441,000352,000
01/08/2007501,000336,000
01/09/2007397,000289,000
01/10/2007477,000383,000
01/11/2007477,000343,000
01/12/2007411,000322,000
01/01/2008335,000344,000
01/02/2008441,000278,000
01/03/2008476,000313,000
01/04/2008438,000388,000
01/05/2008440,000335,000
01/06/2008459,000347,000
01/07/2008474,000361,000
01/08/2008553,000348,000
01/09/2008466,000427,000
01/10/2008478,000347,000
01/11/2008428,000336,000
01/12/2008439,000332,000
01/01/2009290,000331,000
01/02/2009364,000255,000
01/03/2009475,000311,000
01/04/2009423,000298,000
01/05/2009397,000324,000
01/06/2009434,000332,000
01/07/2009442,000327,000
01/08/2009388,000304,000
01/09/2009480,000343,000
01/10/2009455,000336,000
01/11/2009441,000330,000
01/12/2009438,000332,000
01/01/2010259,000307,0006622
01/02/2010353,000217,0008884
01/03/2010460,000316,0007735
01/04/2010379,000307,0009193
01/05/2010352,000271,0007564
01/06/2010413,000289,0002986
01/07/2010398,000292,0003007
01/08/2010419,000296,0003928
01/09/2010426,000305,0006836
01/10/2010409,000305,0004253
01/11/2010456,000322,00010827
01/12/2010425,000328,00011251
01/01/2011270,000279,0003280
01/02/2011324,000211,0006340
01/03/2011400,000307,0006597
01/04/2011360,000246,0004273
01/05/2011356,000308,0007479
01/06/2011393,000259,0008895
01/07/2011397,000301,0008868
01/08/2011449,000343,00016021
01/09/2011343,000309,00013281
01/10/2011326,000247,00019478
01/11/2011329,000240,00019854
01/12/2011259,000219,00012620
01/01/2012210,000194,00022337
01/02/2012257,000149,00029128
01/03/2012279,000190,00020817
01/04/2012232,000176,00012872
01/05/2012286,000202,00019167
01/06/2012272,000192,00041228
01/07/2012257,000190,00018762
01/08/2012265,000187,00013366
01/09/2012312,000195,00022,561
01/10/2012366,000273,00072,968
01/11/2012338,000174,00066,652
01/12/2012266,000159,00050,393
01/01/2013228,000157,92943,231
01/02/2013247,000117,96449,082
01/03/2013247,000144,21329,156
01/04/2013251,000186,69029,311
01/05/2013234,000155,03124,985
01/06/2013218,000148,45335,281
01/07/2013232,000160,79331,292
01/08/2013210,000140,74932,638
01/09/2013254,000145,41427,969
01/10/2013381,186213,58971,447
01/11/2013606,061358,799138,394
01/12/2013309,978260,32593,626
01/01/2014214,944188,87093,57973,618
01/02/2014253,295169,946106,70877,109
01/03/2014269,497195,773134,80292,080
01/04/2014252,047201,512133,319104,617
01/05/2014228,628179,604124,802100,417
01/06/2014201,381163,56898,58687,363
01/07/2014219,026145,714104,62573,414
01/08/2014223,581150,623113,96076,153
01/09/2014283,877180,965138,186102,117
01/10/2014309,890232,178118,527108,942
01/11/2014270,603216,783108,79388,088
01/12/2014311,298250,638103,86781,917
01/01/2015190,554155,78973,97758,597
01/02/2015291,341230,518102,44590,566
01/03/2015382,809304,679135,965103,196
01/04/2015272,996214,556108,97679,892
01/05/2015239,574197,166108,49988,984
01/06/2015229,825174,688105,81483,896
01/07/2015239,343192,299108,28786,631
01/08/2015253,099195,183116,63393,783
01/09/2015279,411223,703128,043100,534
01/10/2015349,278274,581161,602121,335
01/11/2015343,870274,206161,034131,736
01/12/2015310,293242,630148,668117,677
01/01/2016245,922189,143139,539109,708
01/02/2016390,645305,057176,036143,238
01/03/2016453,964361,399244,232196,273
01/04/2016386,456273,751204,748151,645
01/05/2016345,146261,324169,711127,352
01/06/2016335,879252,712143,231104,674
01/07/2016303,404221,175140,898103,662
01/08/2016310,132209,178149,026108,997
01/09/2016349,203271,374154,142116,032
01/10/2016486,878384,023150,747118,328
01/11/2016386,585297,468147,607116,24530,82623,642

More information

At-a-glance summary

The number of domestic gas and electricity customers switching supplier generally follows a seasonal pattern (with peaks around March and November then dipping in January and the summer months). Switching declined significantly from 2008 to 2012, then levelled out and started rising again from 2015. The increase has picked up significantly since the start of 2016, with the total number of switches in 2016 up to the end of November being 27% higher compared with the same period in 2015.

We have introduced a new indicator showing the net switching gains for small and medium suppliers in each month. These net gains stood at around 31,000 and 24,000 meter points for electricity and gas respectively. This figure has halved since the summer.

Relevance and further information

External switching, from one supplier to another, is one measure of consumer engagement with the market. The number of switches to small and medium sized suppliers show how these suppliers are attracting customers over time.

Methodology

The number of customers switching supplier shown in the graph is based on the number of meter points a supplier gains from another following a customer choice to change their supplier.

The net gains for small and medium suppliers is calculated by subtracting from the gross meter point gains these suppliers achieve over the month the gross number of meter points these suppliers lose over the same period.

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Chart

Source: Energylinx.

Information correct as of: December 2016

This chart compares the cheapest available tariffs offered by the six large suppliers with the cheapest tariff available in the market by payment method (direct debit, standard credit and prepayment). Figures are based on a typical domestic dual fuel customer.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Cheapest tariffs by payment method: Typical domestic dual fuel customer (GB)
DateLarge six suppliers (direct debit)Large six suppliers (standard credit)Large six suppliers (prepayment)Market (direct debit)Market (standard credit)Market (prepayment)
28/01/2012915.27976.71021.54906.56971.04969.61
28/02/2012886.18976.71021.54878.1971.04969.61
28/03/2012886.18976.71021.54878.1971.04969.61
28/04/2012895.69953.41021.54878.1953.4969.24
28/05/2012895.69953.41021.54878.1890.12969.24
28/06/2012895.69953.41021.54895.69953.41017.42
28/07/2012895.69953.41021.54875.93953.41017.42
28/08/2012899.1957.031021.54875.93957.031017.42
28/09/2012901.471020.711021.54875.93988.141017.42
28/10/2012906.171020.711069.39893.85988.141019.3
28/11/2012958.211020.711069.39909.59979.351045.64
28/12/2012990.71071.381133.19909.59979.351045.64
28/01/2013957.181037.21133.19909.59979.351045.64
28/02/2013957.181037.21133.19909.591037.21045.64
28/03/2013966.541046.571133.19909.591046.571045.64
28/04/2013966.541046.571133.19909.591046.571045.64
28/05/2013966.541046.571133.19962.43996.91045.64
28/06/2013966.541046.571133.19769.95996.91045.64
28/07/2013984.681075.511133.19769.95996.91045.64
28/08/2013971.771051.791133.19769.951051.791045.64
28/09/2013971.771051.791133.19769.951051.791045.64
28/10/20131011.81079.911133.19769.951070.991093.35
28/11/2013993.41058.151150.97769.951058.151093.35
28/12/20131033.471101.651178.61769.951101.651093.35
28/01/20141033.471101.651178.61975.211101.651172.77
28/02/20141033.971108.11178.61966.341108.11172.77
28/03/20141024.791117.271178.61964.311117.271171.39
28/04/20141000.381069.951178.61946.421069.951171.39
28/05/20141000.381069.951178.61944.551069.951171.39
28/06/20141000.381069.951170.86944.551069.951162.4
28/07/20141000.381069.951170.86944.951029.051162.4
28/08/20141000.381069.951170.86943.431038.881154.43
28/09/2014960.91030.951170.86942.271030.951154.43
28/10/2014953.41046.451170.86931.021024.451154.43
28/11/2014921.881003.791170.86914.511003.791154.43
28/12/2014916.211003.791170.86906.141003.791151.22
28/01/2015875.4945.461148.99871.26945.461148.99
28/02/2015839.28955.071148.9839.28950.351148.9
28/03/2015836.99907.241148.99836.99907.241116.99
28/04/2015834.57977.561141.64834.57977.561131.6
28/05/2015835.19905.441141.64830.56905.441131.6
28/06/2015835.71981.781122.97830.56940.91122.97
28/07/2015863.85981.781122.97830.56939.851122.97
28/08/2015876.03977.321128.54830.56940.271128.54
28/09/2015876.03963.771128.54830.56907.261100.94
28/10/2015803873.251128.54798.67844.041100.94
28/11/2015805.4950.751128.54787.05844.041055.61
28/12/2015850.52950.751102.2787.05844.041055.61
28/01/2016769.69839.941102.2765839.941055.61
28/02/2016690.33808.631092.26690.33808.631054.2
28/03/2016727.7797.761070.37727.7797.761051.22
28/04/2016793.36873.411070.37733.99793.481030.27
28/05/2016723.23877.121037.31723.23877.121017.61
28/06/2016723.23847.451037.31723.23847.451025.39
28/07/2016779.39904.971037.31758.31871.541017.61
28/08/2016801.37941.421043.54769.65871.541017.61
28/09/2016754.64830.111043.54744.3830.11990.56
28/10/2016803.54967.131043.54741.92900.76990.56
28/11/2016897.181002.631035.64862.01937.921017.72
28/12/2016951.511031.571035.64870.03923.481017.72

More information

At-a-glance summary

Direct debit customers are offered the cheapest tariffs, followed by standard credit customers and then those using prepayment meters. The gap between the cheapest tariff on standard credit and direct debit was relatively stable over 2015 and 2016 at around £100, although it has fallen to just over £50 in December 2016 as a result of an overall increase in the cheapest tariffs.

The gap between the cheapest prepayment and direct debit tariff peaked at around £360 in February 2016 and then fell to around £150 in December 2016. This was due to large increases in price of the cheapest direct debit tariff, as well as a fall in the price of the cheapest PPM tariff.

Relevance and further information

This indicator helps us understand pricing by payment methods, as well as how much other suppliers are able to compete with the six large suppliers for each method.

Methodology

We calculate the bill values associated with the different payment methods using a ‘typical medium domestic consumer’. As of September 2015, typical domestic consumption values for a medium consumer are 12,500kWh/year for gas and 3,100kWh/year for electricity (profile class 1). The chart includes collective switching tariffs from Q1 2016.

All tariffs shown in the chart are for a dual fuel customer. Dual fuel refers to a situation where a customer takes gas and electricity from the same supplier.

Tariffs with limited availability depending on customer features (for example, tariffs which are only available to new customers, also known as ‘acquisition’ tariffs, or tariffs restricted to certain regions) are excluded from the calculation to make sure that all tariffs considered are generally available to all customers across GB.

Tariffs available with white label suppliers are included in the calculation of the cheapest tariff. White label suppliers are organisations without supply licenses that partner with an active licensed supplier to offer gas and electricity using their own brand.

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Chart

Source: Energylinx.

Information correct as of: December 2016

This chart shows trends in domestic energy bills by tariff offered by the six large suppliers and other suppliers. It compares their average standard variable tariffs with the cheapest tariffs available in the market (including white label tariffs). Figures are based on a typical domestic dual fuel customer paying by direct debit. 

This information should not be used as a price comparison tool. To find out about accredited price comparison sites, see our impartial guide at Be An Energy Shopper.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Retail price comparison by company and tariff type: Domestic (GB)
DateAverage standard variable tariff (Six large suppliers)Average standard variable tariff (Other suppliers)Cheapest tariff (Six large suppliers)Cheapest tariff (All suppliers)Cheapest tariff (Basket)
28/01/20121020.161026.33915.27906.56947.56
28/02/20121000.761019.41886.18878.10930.29
28/03/2012997.251019.41886.18878.10936.54
28/04/2012997.251019.35895.69878.10937.68
28/05/2012997.251019.35895.69878.10929.78
28/06/2012997.251036.16895.69895.69945.53
28/07/2012997.251034.16895.69875.93928.99
28/08/2012997.251032.02899.10875.93924.85
28/09/2012997.251019.84901.47875.93931.04
28/10/20121009.001022.51906.17893.85956.00
28/11/20121030.781046.91958.21909.59997.71
28/12/20121061.801089.65990.70909.59994.59
28/01/20131074.421089.65957.18909.59990.81
28/02/20131074.421103.04957.18909.59994.56
28/03/20131074.421103.04966.54909.59995.50
28/04/20131074.421115.23966.54909.59988.37
28/05/20131074.431115.23966.54962.43997.77
28/06/20131074.431115.23966.54769.95967.26
28/07/20131074.451115.23984.68769.95974.82
28/08/20131074.451115.23971.77769.95988.47
28/09/20131074.451115.23971.77769.95979.55
28/10/20131074.451129.021011.80769.95995.67
28/11/20131105.941133.08993.40769.95992.26
28/12/20131138.951133.081033.47769.95997.00
28/01/20141145.841134.251033.47975.211013.73
28/02/20141134.091139.371033.97966.341014.19
28/03/20141128.101136.041024.79964.311016.25
28/04/20141128.101139.051000.38946.42995.26
28/05/20141128.101139.051000.38944.55995.13
28/06/20141128.101139.051000.38944.55992.88
28/07/20141128.101142.671000.38944.95976.39
28/08/20141128.101140.961000.38943.43978.98
28/09/20141128.101171.97960.90942.27972.34
28/10/20141128.101145.38953.40931.02960.15
28/11/20141128.101145.38921.88914.51947.94
28/12/20141128.101144.09916.21906.14929.69
28/01/20151124.331144.09875.40871.26895.39
28/02/20151106.651117.66839.28839.28881.39
28/03/20151106.651102.05836.99836.99892.38
28/04/20151106.651087.00834.57834.57878.56
28/05/20151102.281084.78835.19830.56877.12
28/06/20151102.281084.78835.71830.56871.21
28/07/20151102.281084.78863.85830.56867.88
28/08/20151098.031084.78876.03830.56868.79
28/09/20151098.031074.07876.03830.56858.62
28/10/20151098.031068.87803.00798.67829.34
28/11/20151098.031052.45805.40787.05814.85
28/12/20151098.031063.10850.52787.05806.98
28/01/20161098.031061.63769.69765.00786.27
28/02/20161092.691046.39690.33690.33749.44
28/03/20161071.441038.50727.70727.70756.05
28/04/20161065.971014.78723.91723.91751.58
28/05/20161065.971013.38723.23723.23742.71
28/06/20161065.971020.57723.23723.23751.36
28/07/20161065.971023.81779.39758.31779.72
28/08/20161065.971016.87801.37769.65789.25
28/09/20161065.971019.16754.64744.30777.00
28/10/20161065.971037.62803.54741.92792.25
28/11/20161065.971052.12897.18862.01874.62
28/12/20161065.971028.02951.51870.03888.17

More information

At-a-glance summary

From the start of 2014 until early 2016, the price difference significantly increased between the average standard variable tariff and the cheapest tariff available in the market. This is because the price of the cheapest tariffs fell at a much faster rate than that of the average standard variable tariff. The differential peaked in February 2016 at well above £300. Since then, the cheapest tariff in the market and that offered by the six large suppliers have increased by around 26% and 38% respectively, driven in part by increases in wholesale prices. As a result, there has been a fall in the price differential relative to the average standard variable tariff for the six large suppliers. As of December 2016, this price differential had fallen to around £200.

We have recently introduced a new indicator showing the average of the cheapest tariffs from the ten cheapest suppliers in the market. The differential between this indicator and the average standard variable tariff for the six large suppliers stood at around £180 in December, compared to around £270 in October.

Relevance and further information

Tariff differentials reflect pricing in different market segments, as well as how much other suppliers are able to compete on price with the six large suppliers.

Methodology

We calculate the bill values associated with the different tariff types using a ‘typical medium domestic consumer’. As of September 2015, typical consumption values for a medium consumer are 12,500kWh/year for gas and 3,100kWh/year for electricity (profile class 1). The chart includes collective switching tariffs from Q1 2016. All tariffs shown in the chart are for a dual fuel, direct debit customer.

Dual fuel refers to a situation where a customer takes gas and electricity from the same supplier.

A standard variable tariff refers to a supply contract which is for a period of an indefinite length and which does not contain a fixed term period that applies to any of the terms and conditions. It’s an energy supplier’s basic offer. If a customer does not choose a specific energy plan, for example after their fixed tariff ends, they will be moved on a standard variable tariff until they have chosen a new one. A customer can also make an active choice to select a standard variable tariff.

Tariffs with limited availability depending on customer features (for example, tariffs which are only available to new customers, also known as ‘acquisition’ tariffs, or tariffs restricted to certain regions) are excluded from the calculation to make sure that all tariffs considered are generally available to all customers across GB.

Tariffs available with white label suppliers are included in the calculation of the cheapest tariffs. White label suppliers are organisations without supply licenses that partner with an active licensed supplier to offer gas and electricity using their own brand.

To calculate the average of the cheapest tariffs from the ten cheapest suppliers we took the cheapest tariff offered by each supplier in the market (i.e. one tariff per supplier) and then ranked the tariffs in order of price. We then took the simple average of the ten cheapest tariffs in this list. This method is to ensure a cross section of suppliers is included in the calculation.

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Chart

Source: Supplier complaints data.

Information correct as of: August 2016

This graph shows the number of complaints per 100,000 customer accounts made to the six largest energy companies, as reported by the companies. The number of complaints is shown as an average across the six companies, weighted by the number of customer accounts that each company has. Complaints are defined as any expression of dissatisfaction. Since April 2013, most of the small and medium sized suppliers have also published data on customer complaints.

You can also view complaints per 100,000 customer accounts broken down by company, for both large and independent suppliers. See supplier performance on consumer complaints.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by the large suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts (GB)
Complaints per 100,000 customer accounts
2008 Q4 2,438
2009 Q1 2,580
2009 Q2 2,293
2009 Q3 2,271
2009 Q4 2,464
2010 Q1 2,578
2010 Q2 2,513
2010 Q3 2,670
2010 Q4 2,189
2011 Q1 2,146
2011 Q2 1,978
2011 Q3 2,452
2011 Q4 2,773
2012 Q1 3,378
2012 Q2 3,018
2012 Q3 2,910
2012 Q4 3,024
2013 Q1 3,116
2013 Q2 2,847
2013 Q3 2,682
2013 Q4 3,176
2014 Q1 3,747
2014 Q2 3,638
2014 Q3 3,404
2014 Q4 3,566
2015 Q1 3,599
2015 Q2 2,905
2015 Q3 2,631
2015 Q4 2,117
2016 Q1 1,971
2016 Q2 1,869

More information

Complaints per 100,000 customer accounts (GB): At-a-glance summary

The number of complaints made to the six largest suppliers has declined from a peak in Q1 2014 of 3,747 per 100,000 customer accounts. In Q2 2016 the number of complaints made per 100,000 customer accounts across the six large suppliers was 1,869, which compares with 2,905 complaints per 100,000 customer accounts in Q2 2015, a decrease of 36%.

Relevance 

Customer service is a major issue for energy consumers. To help increase the visibility of supplier performance on complaints handling we require suppliers to publish quarterly complaints information on their websites. To facilitate consumers viewing and comparing performance, Ofgem publishes quarterly complaints handling figures, as reported by the companies. 

View the latest figures at supplier performance on consumer complaints.

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Estimated network costs per domestic customer (GB average).

Source: Ofgem analysis of network companies’ cost information .

Information correct as of: 1 February 2017

This chart shows our estimate of trends in the annual cost of the different components of network charges for a domestic customer with a fixed amount of consumption. Balancing Services Use of System charges are not included in the chart.

Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, an explanation of network costs and for further detail on how we calculate the costs.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - distribution
  • Electricity - transmission
  • Gas - distribution
  • Gas - transmission

Data Table

Estimated network costs per domestic customer (GB average)
Annualised network costsElectricity (transmission)Electricity (distribution)Gas (transmission)Gas (distribution)
Apr-1323.3091.308.90115.00
May-1323.3091.308.90115.00
Jun-1323.3091.308.90115.00
Jul-1323.3091.308.90115.00
Aug-1323.3091.308.90115.00
Sep-1323.3091.308.90115.00
Oct-1323.3091.309.90114.60
Nov-1323.3091.309.90114.60
Dec-1323.3091.309.90114.60
Jan-1423.3091.309.90114.60
Feb-1423.3091.309.90114.60
Mar-1423.3091.309.90114.60
Apr-1426.8094.3010.10115.00
May-1426.8094.3010.10115.00
Jun-1426.8094.3010.10115.00
Jul-1426.8094.3010.10115.00
Aug-1426.8094.3010.10115.00
Sep-1426.8094.3010.10115.00
Oct-1426.8094.3010.30115.10
Nov-1426.8094.3010.30115.10
Dec-1426.8094.3010.30115.10
Jan-1526.8094.3010.30115.10
Feb-1526.8094.3010.30115.10
Mar-1526.8094.3010.30115.10
Apr-1531.7087.209.70118.40
May-1531.7087.209.70118.40
Jun-1531.7087.209.70118.40
Jul-1531.7087.209.70118.40
Aug-1531.7087.209.70118.40
Sep-1531.7087.209.70118.40
Oct-1531.7087.209.60119.20
Nov-1531.7087.209.60119.20
Dec-1531.7087.209.60119.20
Jan-1631.7087.209.60119.20
Feb-1631.7087.209.60119.20
Mar-1631.7087.209.60119.20
Apr-1638.3092.9010.00119.70
May-1638.3092.9010.00119.70
Jun-1638.3092.9010.00119.70
Jul-1638.3092.9010.00119.70
Aug-1638.3092.9010.00119.70
Sep-1638.3092.9010.00119.70
Oct-1638.3092.909.70121.70
Nov-1638.3092.909.70121.70
Dec-1638.3092.909.70121.70
Jan-1738.3092.909.70121.70
Feb-1738.3092.909.70121.70
Mar-1738.3092.909.70121.70
Apr-1737.8085.809.60118.20
May-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Jun-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Jul-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Aug-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Sep-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Oct-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Nov-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Dec-1737.8085.809.60118.20
Jan-1837.8085.809.60118.20
Feb-1837.8085.809.60118.20
Mar-1837.8085.809.60118.20

More information

Estimated network costs per domestic customer: At-a-glance summary

  • The majority of network costs for a domestic customer are for the use of the gas and electricity distribution networks.
  • For a household whose consumption does not change, on average across GB we expect a reduction in all categories of network costs in 2017/18 compared to the previous charging year.
  • Actual costs will vary depending on where a customer lives, how much energy they use, and what type of meter they have.

What are network costs?

Suppliers are charged for the costs to build, maintain, improve and operate the energy networks. Most of the networks are owned by monopoly businesses. Therefore through regulation, we limit the revenue that these companies can recover from customer charges to run the networks.

The network charges paid by suppliers vary depending on where their customers live, what type of meter they have, when energy is used and how much energy they use. In total, these charges accounted for approximately a quarter of a dual fuel bill in 2015.

Different charges apply for the high voltage/pressure transmission networks (which take electricity and gas around Great Britain) and the lower voltage/pressure distribution networks, which connect customers to the overall networks.

As well as the charges to suppliers that are considered here, electricity generators and gas producers are also charged for their use of the networks. It is important to note that trends in network costs will therefore also affect supplier costs indirectly through wholesale prices.

Methodology

  • Network costs are calculated by combining charging information published by the network companies with assumptions about consumption and losses for domestic customers.
  • All costs are calculated for medium annual typical domestic consumption values of 12,500kWh for gas and 3,100kWh of electricity, which is held fixed across the charging years. The actual network costs a supplier incurs to serve a customer will depend on how much energy is used, the timing of its use as well as the charges that apply from one year to the next.
  • The costs shown are GB averages, calculated by taking a customer number weighted average of the tariffs that apply in different regions of the country.
  • The costs are expressed in nominal money (i.e. the amount of money a customer ‘pays over the counter’), rather than in real terms (i.e. after adjusting for inflation). For electricity, the costs reported are for a standard unrestricted meter.
  • Balancing Services Use of System charges are not included on the chart. These charges cover the cost of services used to balance the electricity system and internal system operator operating costs.

The methodology we use to calculate these charges is consistent with our methodology for the Supplier Cost Index, and that used to set the value of the prepayment meter price cap. Further details on the calculations are available in our Supplier Cost Index methodology.

Further information

You can find further information on the different components making up an energy bill at Understand your gas and electricity bill.

To see how the network fits together, visit The energy network: How it works for you.

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Network availability: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1).

Source: RIIO gas distribution annual report 2015-16.

Information correct as of: February 2017

This chart is an indicator of network availability. It shows the gas distribution network availability as a percentage over the three completed years of the RIIO-GD1 price control. Availability for 2015/16 has been consistently 99.998 for GB customers. You can see how this breaks down by network owner in the table below.

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

National Grid Gas Distribution

99.997%

99.997%

99.996%

Northern Gas Networks

99.998%

99.998%

99.998%

Scotia Gas Networks

99.997%

99.998%

99.998%

Wales & West Utilities

99.999%

99.998%

99.999%

We update this chart on an annual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Gas - distribution

Data Table

Network availability: Gas distribution (RIIO-GD1)
Year 1 (2013-14)Year 2 (2014-15)Year 3 (2015-16)
NGGD99.997%99.997%99.996%
NGN99.998%99.998%99.998%
SGN99.997%99.998%99.998%
WWU99.999%99.998%99.999%

More information

Network availability: At-a-glance summary

Network availability (availability of supply) to GB consumers was 99.998% in 2015-16 and has been consistent over the RIIO-GD1 period so far.   

Relevance and further information

  • Network availability is the time (as a % of total time during that period) that the GD network is available to consumers.
  • Network availability accounts for both planned and unplanned interruptions. 

Methodology

Each year, network companies must report on their performance under the RIIO-GD1 price control. Our review of their submissions and supporting information informs our annual publications on network company performance.

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Chart tips: Click on titles in a chart legend to switch data series on and off. View and sort chart numbers using the chart’s ‘data table’ tab, or download data in a variety of formats including images using the menu buttonmenu button