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Chart

Source: Ofgem analysis of supplier data submissions.

Information correct as of: 27 April 2017

This chart shows the number of domestic customer accounts paying by non-prepayment methods for each of the 10 larger suppliers. The number is broken down into four categories: accounts on a standard variable tariff (‘SVT’) held for more than three years with a supplier, accounts on an SVT held for less than three years with a supplier, accounts on other non-standard variable tariffs and accounts on fixed tariffs.

The chart is based on the latest available information submitted to us by suppliers (31 October 2016).

We update this chart on a biannual basis. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the key figures, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on our methodology.

Policy Areas:

  • Business consumers
  • Domestic consumers
  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Gas - retail markets

Data Table

Number of non-prepayment domestic customer accounts by supplier: Standard variable, fixed and other tariffs (GB)
SupplierFixed tariffOther non-standard variable tariffsStandard variable tariff (less than three years)Standard variable tariff (more than three years)
British Gas1,982,68602,302,6422,920,200
SSE571,550380,1821,210,3351,408,481
E.ON1,029,973201,227,2671,246,765
EDF1,368,9530435,4901,079,104
Scottish Power1,374,87358,414403,803711,901
RWE npower1,135,3030426,761964,098
First Utility749,3300140,35822,798
OVO415,8300104,0796,283
Utility Warehouse49,598156,641259,6910
Coop143,969096,4832,050

More information

At-a-glance summary

At October 2016, the proportion of domestic customer accounts on standard variable tariffs (‘SVT’) and paying by non-prepayment methods was 61% on average, split between those SVT accounts held for more than three years (34%) and those held for less than three years (27%). All other accounts were mainly on fixed tariffs (36%), with 2% on other non-SVTs. The proportions vary significantly across suppliers.

When considering all payment methods, the proportion of domestic customer accounts on SVTs at October 2016, based on the data for the larger 10 suppliers, was 65% on average.

Relevance and further information

This chart tracks the number of customers on different tariff types. Along with other switching and consumer research statistics it helps us understand customer engagement with the energy market.

It should be considered jointly with our chart, Average tariff prices by supplier in the last quarter: Standard variable vs cheapest available tariffs (GB)

Our data shows SVTs are usually more expensive than other deals available in the market. As of October 2016 around 19 million domestic energy accounts (15 million paying by non-prepayment methods) are on SVTs. These customers are potentially missing out on significant savings on their bills compared to cheaper tariffs from their existing or another supplier.  

To view our previously published snapshot of the number of SVT customers by supplier and the potential savings available to them (reflective of prices at 28 November 2016), see Standard variable tariff comparison: 28 November 2016. Due to different calculation methods, the 28 November snapshot should not be used as a like-for-like comparison with the data in this chart. In particular, this is because our calculations here exclude prepayment accounts. See our methodology below for further detail.

Methodology

  • We do not include suppliers with fewer than 250,000 non-prepayment customer accounts in our data, for either gas or electricity. 
  • We do not show the proportion of prepayment accounts on the different tariff types. This is because Ofgem has introduced a price cap to limit the amount suppliers can charge prepayment customers. These customers have a limited tariff choice available to them and so can’t access many of the cheapest deals. The price cap applied from 1 April 2017. It lasts until 2020, when we expect smart meters to give prepay customers access to better deals. 
  • For each supplier, a ‘dual fuel’ customer account (i.e. where a customer takes gas and electricity from the same supplier) is counted as one account, rather than two separate accounts. While the dual fuel figure can be used as a proxy for the number of customers with each supplier, please note that adding these accounts across suppliers would result in double counting forcustomers who get their gas and electricity from different suppliers. We do not show dual fuel accounts where a customer has a different tariff type for each fuel as this situation is fairly rare.

What are the different tariff types?

The different tariff types that this chart refers to are:

Standard variable rate tariffs (‘SVT’)

An SVT is a supply contract with an indefinite length that does not have a fixed-term applying to the terms and conditions. It’s an energy supplier’s basic offer.

If a customer does not choose a specific energy plan, for example after their fixed tariff ends, they are moved to an SVT until they choose a new one. A customer can also make an active choice to select an SVT.

All suppliers have an SVT. It is usually more expensive than other plans they can offer customers.

Fixed tariffs

A fixed tariff is a supply contract with terms and conditions which apply for a fixed period (for example, a contract offered by a supplier that has a standing and unit price that is fixed for a year).

All tariffs shown are for a domestic customer with typical ‘medium’ consumption (3,100 kWh/year for electricity and 12,500 kWh/year for gas). 

Other non-standard variable tariffs

A non-standard variable tariff is a supply contract with an indefinite length that does not have a fixed-term applying to the terms and conditions and has also associated rewards schemes, bundles or added services.

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Prepayment and direct debit prices since January 2016 (GB).

Source: Ofgem analysis of Energylinx data.

Information correct as of: June 2017

This chart compares trends in prices since 2016 for a dual fuel customer paying by direct debit or prepayment. It shows both the market cheapest tariffs and average standard variable tariffs (SVT) for the two payment methods. The values are calculated for a customer with typical energy use in line with 2015 update.

The chart also shows the level of the prepayment price cap (the black dotted line) for a dual fuel customer with a single rate electricity meter. The cap came into force on 1 April 2017. Suppliers must set their prepayment prices at or beneath this level.

We update this chart on a monthly basis using prices as of the 28th of the preceding month. Click the ‘more information’ tab above for a summary of the latest trends, details of how to interpret the figures and for information on our methodology, including how we calculate the averages.

Policy Areas:

  • Electricity - retail markets
  • Electricity - wholesale markets
  • Gas - retail markets
  • Gas - wholesale markets

Data Table

Prepayment and direct debit prices since January 2016 (GB)
DateSVT - direct debit (market average)SVT - prepayment (market average)Cheapest tariff - direct debit (all suppliers)Cheapest tariff - prepayment (all suppliers)Prepayment price cap (1 Apr to 30 Sep)
28/12/20151091.801162.90770.591055.61
28/01/20161091.211162.027651055.61
28/02/20161086.421157.54738.381054.2
28/03/20161067.281136.82727.451051.22
28/04/20161059.681129.69723.911030.27
28/05/20161059.681129.69723.231017.61
28/06/20161059.681129.69723.23985.97
28/07/20161059.561127.72758.31985.97
28/08/20161059.561127.72769.65985.97
28/09/20161059.561127.72744.3985.97
28/10/20161059.741127.72741.92985.97
28/11/20161059.741120.44790.02985.97
28/12/20161059.741120.44790.02985.97
28/01/20171057.191113.33833.71985.97
28/02/20171057.191113.33833.71985.97
28/03/20171070.911106.02833.71985.97
28/04/20171108.801050.14880.42999.731067.14
28/05/20171108.801050.14849.57992.831067.14
28/06/20171115.961049.86849.74992.771067.14
28/07/20171067.14
28/08/20171067.14
28/09/20171067.14

More information

At-a-glance summary

In April 2017, the new prepayment price cap came into force, limiting the amount that suppliers can charge their prepayment customers. After the introduction of the cap, the market average standard variable tariff (SVT) fell by around £70 for a prepayment customer with typical energy use on a dual fuel tariff. Looking at just the six large suppliers, the average reduction was around £80.

As a result of these reductions and the price increases we have seen for customers using other payment methods in the first half of 2017, the market average direct debit SVT was around £66 more expensive for a direct debit customer than for a prepayment customer as of 28 June. Note that cost differences will exist to serve prepayment and direct debit customers.

The average SVT for a prepayment customer has remained above both the cheapest prepayment and direct debit tariffs available in the market, even after the price reductions following the cap introduction. The cheapest available prepayment tariffs have been consistently more expensive than the cheapest tariffs available for those paying by direct debit throughout the period.

Direct debit and prepayment SVTs vary significantly between suppliers. As of 28 June, the supplier with the cheapest dual fuel direct debit SVT was approximately £140 a year cheaper than the supplier with the most expensive SVT (for a customer with typical energy use). The equivalent difference was approximately £50 for prepayment.

Relevance and further information

This chart helps us track the differences between the price a customer will pay depending on if they use prepayment (where prices are capped) or direct debit to pay their energy bills.

You can find further information on the price cap at Prepayment meter price cap. The cap lasts until 2020. By then we expect the smart meter roll-out to give prepay customers access to better deals.

Methodology

  • We calculate the annual bill values associated with the different tariff types based on a typical domestic consumer who uses a ‘medium’ amount of energy each year. These values are currently 12,500kWh/year for gas and 3,100kWh/year for electricity (profile class 1).  
  • All prices shown are for a dual fuel customer (i.e. where a customer takes gas and electricity from the same supplier). 
  • The market average SVTs are based on the prices of the 10 largest suppliers in the direct debit and prepayment segments. We have weighted the SVT of each supplier using an estimate of their total share of all SVT customers (for direct debit), and their total share of all prepayment accounts (for prepayment). We update the weightings every six months in January and July to reflect customer numbers four months prior to publication. The time lag is due to data availability. For example, the average given for 28 January 2017 uses weights based on customer numbers at 31 October 2016, while the average for 28 December 2016 uses weights at 31 March 2016. 
  • An SVT refers to a supply contract which is for a period of an indefinite length, and which does not have a fixed-term period applying to any of the terms and conditions. It’s an energy supplier’s basic offer. If a customer does not choose a specific energy plan, for example after their fixed tariff ends, they will be moved onto an SVT until they have chosen a new one. A customer can also make an active choice to select an SVT. 
  • We exclude tariffs with limited availability – such as tariffs only available to new customers (also known as ‘acquisition’ tariffs) or tariffs restricted to certain regions - when calculating the market cheapest tariff. This is so we give a representative picture of tariffs generally available to all customers across GB. 
  • We include tariffs available with ‘white label’ suppliers in our calculation of the cheapest tariffs. White label suppliers are organisations without supply licenses that partner with an active licensed supplier to offer gas and electricity using their own brand. 
  • The cheapest tariff shown on the chart includes any collective switching tariffs after the first quarter of 2016. 
  • In all cases, the prices shown are based on suppliers’ tariffs averaged across GB regions. 
  • The level of the prepayment price cap is based on the values published on our website, adjusted to reflect current typical domestic consumption values, and to include VAT.
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by small-sized energy suppliers by the end of the next working day from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by small-sized suppliers by end of next working day (%)
Quarter/YearEcotricity Spark EnergyGood EnergyGreen Star EnergyEconomy EnergyFlow Energy
Q1 201493886437
Q2 201488826423
Q3 201492885924
Q4 201481836331
Q1 201585825920
Q2 20158459633410
Q3 201585706037278
Q4 2015867853192723
Q1 2016687651172621
Q2 2016477742274324
Q3 2016457129325418
Q4 2016576147284516
Q1 2017656459281115
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by the six large energy suppliers by the end of the next day from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2013 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by the six large suppliers by end of next working day (%)
Quarter/YearBritish GasEDF energyE.ONnpowerScottishPowerSSE
Q1 2013799193876375
Q2 2013728993876565
Q3 2013728389896272
Q4 2013768281905073
Q1 2014808482865082
Q2 2014788480815185
Q3 2014778481855186
Q4 2014758782894985
Q1 2015758481884887
Q2 2015707678744788
Q3 2015687875695288
Q4 2015577970635584
Q1 2016577768394977
Q2 2016528063485477
Q3 2016547959585975
Q4 2016517364505874
Q1 2017507467495876
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by medium-sized energy suppliers by the end of the next working day from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by medium-sized suppliers by end of next working day (%)
Quarter/YearCo-OperativeFirst UtilityOvoUtilitaUtility WarehouseExtra Energy
Q1 20146515708291
Q2 2014514280658821
Q3 2014412575839238
Q4 2014355071869519
Q1 2015494873899517
Q2 2015515283958221
Q3 2015345069956928
Q4 2015334858928130
Q1 2016354534828643
Q2 2016274730867924
Q3 2016306430848227
Q4 2016245636897950
Q1 2017436451907539
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by small-sized energy suppliers within eight weeks from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by small-sized suppliers within eight weeks (%)
Quarter/YearEcotricity Spark EnergyGood EnergyGreen Star EnergyEconomy EnergyFlow Energy
Q1 2014100999693
Q2 20141009810095
Q3 20141009910093
Q4 20141009999100
Q1 2015100998486
Q2 20151009686100
Q3 20151009791749477
Q4 201510099938910085
Q1 201610099918299100
Q2 2016959987819996
Q3 20169499819795
Q4 20169699869195
Q1 2017999791
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by medium-sized energy suppliers within eight weeks from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by medium-sized suppliers within eight weeks (%)
Quarter/YearCo-OperativeFirst UtilityOvoUtilitaUtility WarehouseExtra Energy
Q1 20149891999999
Q2 20149981999999100
Q3 20149874999999100
Q4 201499789599100100
Q1 20159881969910078
Q2 20159385999910071
Q3 20159084991009782
Q4 20159380991009872
Q1 2016918095999990
Q2 2016948497999749
Q3 201681889710097.9
Q4 20168789969997
Q1 2017899898
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the percentage of complaints resolved by the six large energy suppliers within eight weeks from when a complaint was reported over the period Q1 2013 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints resolved by the six large suppliers within eight weeks (%)
Quarter/YearBritish GasEDF energyE.ONnpowerScottishPowerSSE
Q1 2013969798979896
Q2 2013949599979896
Q3 2013949697979895
Q4 2013969787969796
Q1 2014969794949497
Q2 2014969793949397
Q3 2014949694978697
Q4 2014949795977997
Q1 2015959794978797
Q2 2015939692959597
Q3 2015929791959598
Q4 2015919891929797
Q1 2016919891869596
Q2 2016909890919896
Q3 2016919889929896
Q4 2016919791929796
Q1 2017909796
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Chart

Source: Supplier data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the total number of complaints received by the small-sized energy suppliers per 10,000 customer accounts per quarter over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by small-sized suppliers per 10,000 customer accounts
Quarter/YearEcotricity Spark EnergyGood EnergyGreen Star EnergyEconomy EnergyFlow Energy
Q1 20141919320021
Q2 20142515619813
Q3 20143719520419
Q4 20144237822728
Q1 20155417919934
Q2 201547791105631
Q3 20152973114548634
Q4 201527811277510143
Q1 201631104135867638
Q2 2016301051031164368
Q3 20163794571404746
Q4 20163086421195149
Q1 20173210581895943
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the total number of complaints received by the medium-sized energy suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts per quarter over the period Q1 2014 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by medium-sized suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts
Quarter/YearCo-OperativeFirst UtilityOvoUtilitaUtility WarehouseExtra Energy
Q1 20143491,1821,3451,2241,949
Q2 20144869568393601,84511
Q3 20144179496494471,77246
Q4 20142479786311,2142,117188
Q1 20152841,2276891,2382,711569
Q2 20155481,0696257031,611618
Q3 20151,2701,2125797271,322759
Q4 20151,0691,0921641,4671,9921,190
Q1 20161,2231,3541462,3792,7691,121
Q2 20168401,0021124,6522,007655
Q3 20166561,091803,3681,785820
Q4 20165631,479783,8401,3852,404
Q1 20176912,052795,6851,0733,708
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Chart

Source: Suppliers data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This graph shows the total number of complaints received by the six large energy suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts per quarter over the period Q1 2013 to Q1 2017.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by the six large suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts
QuarterBritish GasEDF energyE.ONnpowerScottishPowerSSE
Q1 20132,2957,7843,1704,9181,5191,376
Q2 20131,6965,9463,3205,6261,6111,532
Q3 20131,5824,6462,9366,8671,3301,335
Q4 20132,4124,2283,2258,0131,3991,686
Q1 20143,0844,6143,7588,3031,3572,760
Q2 20142,8445,0113,9216,8901,6483,081
Q3 20142,7254,2763,4826,2582,0312,985
Q4 20142,8515,3413,3526,5682,0692,813
Q1 20153,0514,1083,6955,6352,6483,474
Q2 20152,5072,7123,2373,3382,7203,357
Q3 20152,1412,6392,5392,8982,7193,475
Q4 20151,7142,3842,0802,0952,4122,594
Q1 20161,8662,5062,0391,6742,2121,751
Q2 20161,5742,5331,7202,0562,3181,665
Q3 20161,5182,3531,6431,6052,2521,577
Q4 20161,5552,2231,8391,8742,4421,598
Q1 20171,4632,4382,2502,2002,4931,929
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Chart

Source: Supplier data.

Information correct as of: May 2017

This chart shows the total number of complaints received quarterly by each energy supplier group per 100,000 customer accounts between Q1 2014 and Q1 2017.

Within the small-sized supplier group, Green Star Energy began submitting data in Q3 2015 and Economy Energy began submitting data in Q2 2015.

Policy Areas:

  • Domestic consumers

Data Table

Complaints received by all suppliers per 100,000 customer accounts (GB)
QuarterSix large suppliersMedium-sized suppliersSmall-sized suppliers
Q1 20143,7962,6401,241
Q2 20143,6511,1341,033
Q3 20143,4049961,256
Q4 20143,5551,1332,103
Q1 20153,5981,3401,267
Q2 20152,905976668
Q3 20152,6311,071631
Q4 20152,1171,102749
Q1 20161,9711,405777
Q2 20161,8691,372788
Q3 20161,7451,231730
Q4 20161,8271,506659
Q1 20171,9831,974696
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