Ofgem’s academic panel

What is the academic panel and why was it set up?

The panel is made up of nine academics with a wide range of experience including regulatory economics, competition economics, behavioural economics, statistics and econometrics, and economic evaluation.

The aim of the panel is to:

  • Enhance Ofgem's strategic thinking and early-stage policy development. The academic panel will meet twice a year to engage with SLT and advise policy teams on specific projects. The panel also provides advice on an ad hoc basis between meetings.
  • Enable the organisation to build wider links to the academic community by highlighting relevant work and providing recommendations for engagement on specific projects.
  • Improve knowledge exchange between Ofgem and the academic community through trainings, seminars and contributions to think pieces on policy issues. 

Who is on the Ofgem academic panel?

Carlos Batlle

MIT

  • Research Scholar MIT
  • Associate Professor Comillas Pontifical University 
  • Electricity Advisor of Florence School of Regulation

Research interests

  • Power sector regulation, economics and policy, operation, and planning risk management
  • Modelling of electricity generation and networks
  • Environmental policy

Xeni Dassiou

City University

  • Reader in Economics
  • Director of the Centre for Competition and Regulatory Policy

Research interests

  • Competition Economics
  • Regulation Economics
  • Behavioural strategic analysis in auditing 
  • Industrial and behavioural economics
  • Competition and regulation in public service markets
  • Signalling theory and language formation

Albert Banal-Estanol

City University and Universitat Pompeu Fabra

  • Professor in Economics, City University
  • Associate Professor Universitat Pompeu Fabra
  • Affiliated Professor Barcelona GSE

Research interests

  • Regulation and Competition Policy
  • Econometric modelling of gas and electricity markets
  • Corporate Finance and asset valuation

Rob Gross

Imperial College London

 

  • Director, Centre for Energy Policy and Technology.
  • Policy Director, Energy Futures Lab. 
  • Head of UKERC’s Technology and Policy assessment function.

Research interests

  • Energy policy (cross disciplinary)
  • System modelling and scenarios 
  • Strong interest in technology and innovation

Michael Grubb

UCL

  • Professor of Energy and Climate Change, Bartlett School, Institute of Sustainable Resources
  • Chair of BEIS’s Panel of Technical Experts

Research interests

  • Energy systems and low carbon innovation 
  • Carbon pricing and emissions trading systems 
  • International climate change responses 
  • Integration of renewable electricity sources into electricity systems

Morten Hviid

University of East Anglia

  • Director of Centre for Competition Policy, UEA
  • Professor of competition law, UEA

Research interests

  • Competition law 
  • Industrial economics 
  • Tort law and contract law 
  • Applying economics to legal research 
  • Private enforcement of competition law
  • Practices which facilitate collusive behaviour

Leonardo Meeus

Florence School of Regulation 

   

  • Professor, Florence School of Regulation at the European University Institute. 
  • Professor,  Vlerick Business School

Research interests

  • EU energy and climate policy, EU Clean Energy Package
  • Electricity market design, and network codes
  • Electricity networks regulation, transmission and distribution

Jacopo Torriti

University of Reading

 

  • Professor of Energy Economics and Policy 

Research interests

  • Demand Side Response 
  • Time of Use tariffs
  • Demand side flexibility
  • Economic tools for energy policies e.g. cost-benefit analysis, impact assessment and the standard cost model 
  • Risk analysis and economic appraisals of energy demand 
  • Capacity markets

Catherine Waddams

University of East Anglia

   

  • Faculty member of Centre for Competition Policy
  • Professor at Norwich Business School

Research interests

  • Industrial Organization
  • Privatization
  • Regulation and the introduction of competition 
  • Distributional impact of regulatory reform
  • Consumer choice in newly opened markets