Environmental programmes: Ofgem’s role and delivery performance

Our role

Ofgem delivers renewable energy and social programmes on behalf of government. Our expertise lies in designing, setting up and delivering large scale programmes in the sustainable energy sector. These programmes are in fields as diverse as renewable heat, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel poverty.

We work with energy companies, consumer groups and other stakeholders, including the UK’s elected representatives, to make sure policy targets are met in the most economical and consumer conscious way possible.

We’re also working with a growing number of delivery partners across government, adding value to their operations by sharing our expertise.

Counter fraud

We take allegations of fraud very seriously. To find out how to report suspected fraud within an environmental or social scheme, or to learn more about our role in preventing fraud, please see our Counter Fraud section.

The schemes we administer

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI)

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive encourages the use of renewable heat.

The scheme is funded by HM Treasury and provides quarterly payments over seven years to homeowners who install eligible domestic renewable heat technologies. Only the owner of an eligible installation can apply for the scheme.

We’re responsible for administering this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and the Department for the Economy administers a separate domestic scheme in Northern Ireland.

domesticrhi@ofgem.gov.uk

Feed-in Tariff (FIT)

The Feed-in Tariff scheme encourages uptake of small-scale renewable low carbon electricity generation technologies.

The scheme requires FIT licensees (electricity suppliers) to make fixed tariff payments for electricity generated and exported to the network by accredited installations. The cost of the scheme is shared across all electricity suppliers.

Additional benefits are also available for community and school installations.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, ensuring compliance from electricity suppliers and reporting to the Secretary of State.

renewable@ofgem.gov.uk

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The Renewables Obligation is one of the main support schemes for large-scale renewable electricity generation in the UK. It puts an obligation on licensed electricity suppliers to source a proportion of their supply from renewables.

Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs) are issued to accredited generators for the renewable electricity they generate. These are then used by electricity suppliers to demonstrate they have met their obligation. If suppliers do not have sufficient ROCs to meet their obligations they must instead pay into a ‘buy-out’ fund. Once the compliance period has closed, this fund is redistributed to compliant suppliers.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Utility Regulator in Northern Ireland (UREGNI) through an Agency Services Agreement.

Our role is to accredit generating stations, issue certificates, ensure compliance by electricity suppliers and report annually.

renewable@ofgem.gov.uk

Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO)

The Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO) scheme aims to promote and increase the contribution of renewable energy sources to electricity production across the EU. It provides a common platform for the trade of renewable electricity between member states.

REGOs are certificates which demonstrate electricity has been generated from renewable sources. Their primary purpose is to allow suppliers to meet the Fuel Mix Disclosure condition in their supply license. This requires suppliers to let their customers, and potential customers, know where their electricity is generated from.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and also on behalf of UREGNI through an Agency Services Agreement.

cclandrego@ofgem.gov.uk

Climate Change Levy (CCL) exemption

The Climate Change Levy (CCL) is a tax on UK business energy use, charged at the time of supply. Electricity generated from certain renewable sources before 1 August 2015 was exempt from the CCL.

We administer a certification scheme on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs, which provides evidence for the operation of this tax exemption.

cclandrego@ofgem.gov.uk

Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

The Energy Company Obligation requires larger suppliers to deliver energy efficiency measures such as loft and wall insulation to domestic premises in Great Britain.

Suppliers’ obligations depend on their market share, and delivery of the obligation is market driven. Suppliers are not tied to their own customer base to meet their overall targets.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and reports to the Secretary of State on a monthly basis.

We provide guidance to energy suppliers and those in the supply chain to help them deliver measures that comply with the requirements of the obligation.

eco@ofgem.gov.uk

Warm Home Discount (WHD)

The Warm Home Discount obligates energy suppliers over a certain size to provide support to vulnerable customers in Great Britain.

Most support is provided through annual electricity rebates of £140 to customers in or at risk of fuel poverty. This can include low income pensioners and families with young children. Other support is provided through a mixture of initiatives such as free energy advice and help with clearing energy debts.

We administer the scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, ensuring energy suppliers meet their obligations and reporting annual outcomes to the Secretary of State.

whd@ofgem.gov.uk

Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR)

The Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR) is a scheme that enables eligible renewable generators to enter into a Backstop Power Purchase Agreement (BPPA) with a licensed supplier when they cannot get a standard Purchase Power Agreement through normal commercial avenues.  Eligible renewable generators will need to hold either a Contract for Difference or an Investment Contract.

We administers the scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Our role is to assess generators’ eligibility, run OLR auctions and to share the costs of the scheme fairly across all electricity suppliers.

olr@ofgem.gov.uk

Our performance

Our data shows details of our performance against our three key indicators:

  • How quickly we respond to stakeholders.
  • How long payments and processing take.
  • The availability of our IT systems for scheme participants.

Scheme performance indicators

Every year E-Serve commits to upholding specific service levels for the GB Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI, Feed-In-Tariffs, Renewables Obligation, Energy Company Obligation and Warm Home Discount schemes. These are documented within the key performance indicators section of the Ofgem Forward Work Programme. Meeting or exceeding these indicators is important to us as we want to provide the best possible service to our customers.

Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Ofgem scheme administration: Maintaining system availability.

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows how well the schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'maintaining system availability' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. By 'system availability' we mean whether the IT systems that scheme participants use to apply or submit data were available to them to use. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Maintaining system availability
TargetDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In TariffsEnergy Company Obligation
Aug-1899%100.00%99.93%99.97%99.96%100.00%
Sep-1899%100.00%99.93%99.97%99.96%100.00%
Oct-1899%99.99%99.99%99.89%99.95%100.00%
Nov-1899%100.00%99.99%99.94%99.91%100.00%
Dec-1899%99.98%99.99%99.70%99.61%99.86%
Jan-1999%99.96%99.99%99.70%99.84%100.00%
Feb-1999%99.99%100.00%99.87%99.85%100.00%
Mar-1999%99.93%100.00%99.65%99.96%99.90%
Apr-1999%99.98%99.90%99.62%99.76%100.00%
May-1999%99.98%99.99%99.75%99.88%99.99%
Jun-1999%99.57%99.99%99.97%100.00%99.98%
Jul-1999%99.96%99.95%99.95%99.96%99.37%

More information

All systems were available and above the FY18-19 target this month.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows how well the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI) schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'responding to stakeholders' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI - responding to stakeholders
Domestic RHI targetDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHI targetNon-Domestic RHI
Aug-1890%97.2%90%95.5%
Sep-1890%89.6%90%97.6%
Oct-1890%77.6%90%91.3%
Nov-1890%80.5%90%95.2%
Dec-1890%78.7%90%94.9%
Jan-1990%69.1%90%87.3%
Feb-1990%31.8%90%96.5%
Mar-1990%66.0%90%95.6%
Apr-1990%97.6%90%90.9%
May-1990%98.1%90%81.4%
Jun-1990%38.9%90%72.3%
Jul-1990%68.5%90%60.9%

More information

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) 

In January 2019, an error was identified in the reporting, meaning the KPI was not accurately calculated, which was then corrected and data was back-dated. The corrected data shows that the KPI has been below our FY18-19 target since October 2018. In February 2019, we focussed on closing older, more complex enquiries, and a large number of these were closed. This meant the target was missed, since then, we have seen improvements. In June 2019, the response rate dropped due to resouring and time spend answering calls. This month, July 2019, we have seen a marked improvement in the response rate due to a new starter joining the team.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

We had consistently exceeded our ‘Responding to stakeholders’ KPI FY18-19 target of responding to 90% of queries within 10 working days for over a year, however, in January 2019 the KPI dropped below target to 87.3%. The creation of the One Ofgem enquiries team has enabled us to flex resource across schemes to focus on priority areas. Cross-training is taking place to create a more resilient team, however, this led to a slight drop in the response time whilst this takes place. The team continues to address older queries, and are awaiting the arrival of new staff in September.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows how well the Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT) schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'responding to stakeholders' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Renewables Obligation and Feed-In Tariffs - responding to stakeholders
TargetRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Aug-1890%100.0%100.0%
Sep-1890%97.9%100.0%
Oct-1890%98.9%100.0%
Nov-1890%98.8%98.9%
Dec-1890%98.5%100.0%
Jan-1990%98.8%99.5%
Feb-1990%96.5%99.2%
Mar-1990%93.4%99.2%
Apr-1990%79.2%94.3%
May-1990%55.2%51.4%
Jun-1990%66.2%64.0%
Jul-1990%46.9%60.0%

More information

Renewables Obligation (RO)

We have consistenty exceeded our target throughout the last 12 months, however, in April 2019 the KPI was below the FY18-19 target for the first time. A large number of enquiries were received in March due to the RE scheme closures and additional resource was not brought in to support this. A triage system has been implemented, responding as a priority to applications that would be at risk if we did not respond (e.g. forgotten password to log in to register). As a result, more general queries had to be prioritised accordingly. The team continues to work through the backlog of enquiries relating to the surge in applications at Scheme closure.

Feed-In Tariffs (FITs) 

Throughout 2018-19, the team continued to exceed the FY18-19 target of responding to stakeholders within 10 working days. However, the response rate has been impacted by the high number of enquiries that were received preceding the closure of the FIT scheme on 31st March 2019. Cross-training is taking place in order to improve the resilience and response rates across all schemes.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows how well the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Warm Home Discount (WHD) schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'responding to stakeholders' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO
  • WHD

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Energy Company Obligation and Warm Home Discount - responding to stakeholders
Energy Company Obligation targetEnergy Company ObligationWarm Home Discount targetWarm Home Discount
Aug-1890%100.0%100%100.0%
Sep-1890%100.0%100%100.0%
Oct-1890%100.0%100%100.0%
Nov-1890%100.0%100%100.0%
Dec-1890%84.8%100%100.0%
Jan-1990%94.9%100%100.0%
Feb-1990%88.5%100%100.0%
Mar-1990%89.0%100%100.0%
Apr-1990%99.0%100%100.0%
May-1990%99.5%100%100.0%
Jun-1990%99.5%100%100.0%
Jul-1990%99.0%100%100.0%

More information

Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

Until December 2018, we had consistently surpassed our ‘Responding to stakeholders’ KPI FY18-19 target of responding to 90% of queries within 10 working days. However, in December, the score dropped to 84.8%. The majority of queries that were not responded to within the timeframe were policy related, and most of these were stakeholder feedback on our draft Delivery guidance, which were answered when the guidance was published on 20th December. We were also engaging with suppliers on areas of concern throughout November and December through other avenues. Following this, our performance improved in 2019.

Warm Home Discount (WHD)

We have consistently met our ‘Responding to stakeholders’ KPI target. This means that we've responded to 100% of Warm Home Discount scheme proposals submitted for approval by obligated energy suppliers within 28 days. It is a statutory obligation, which is why it has a higher target than other operational KPIs.

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Ofgem scheme administration: Payments and processing.

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows how well the schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'payments and processing' Key Performance Indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Payments and processing
TargetDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In TariffsEnergy Company Obligation
Aug-1895%96.1%60.4%98.2%100.0%100.0%
Sep-1895%99.3%93.4%97.9%100.0%100.0%
Oct-1895%98.6%97.2%98.9%100.0%100.0%
Nov-1895%98.8%93.0%98.8%100.0%100.0%
Dec-1895%98.9%97.5%98.5%100.0%100.0%
Jan-1995%99.1%97.8%98.8%100.0%100.0%
Feb-1995%97.5%97.5%99.7%100.0%100.0%
Mar-1995%98.5%95.4%98.3%100.0%100.0%
Apr-1995%98.3%97.7%98.7%100.0%100.0%
May-1995%97.8%91.7%97.8%100.0%100.0%
Jun-1995%97.1%92.0%96.2%100.0%100.0%
Jul-1995%95.0%89.2%96.9%100.0%100.0%

More information

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI)

We have consistently surpassed our ‘Payments and processing’ KPI FY18-19 target of making 95% of payments within five working days.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

The 'Payments and Processing' KPI was initially below the FY18-19 target at the beginning of 2018, however, there was a significant improvement in the latter part of the year. There were a few occasions when the KPI dropped below target, due to focus on reducing the queue and the redeployment of resource to other key areas of delivery, but overall the improvement has continued into 2019. Over the last three months, the KPI has decreased slightly, which is due to loss of resource and optimisation of this reource across high volume simple submissions and fewer, more complex cases.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

We consistently achieve our ‘Payments and processing’ KPI target of issuing 95% of ROCs within 17 working days (Apr-Jun) and 12 working days (Jul-Mar).

Feed-In Tariffs (FIT)

Our levelisation team has consistently exceeded our ‘Payments and processing’ KPI target of completing 95% of the quarterly levelisation process within 22 working days.

Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

We have consistently met our KPI target ‘Payments and processing’ KPI target of processing 95% of measures submitted within the calendar month. We are committed to processing all measures where possible by working with suppliers to ensure notifications are of good quality. This has led not only to us achieving our KPI but also to us continuously improving our performance.

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Scheme applications and queues

We track and report on the number of applications we receive and process in a month, as well as the overall length of the queue for the GB Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI, Feed-In-Tariffs, Renewables Obligation, Energy Company Obligation and Warm Home Discount schemes. This helps to show the volume of applications that we are dealing with. It also shows things such as where there have been spikes in applications, which may impact how quickly we are able to process them.

Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows the number of Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI

Data Table

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Aug-186965891,205
Sep-188276871,355
Oct-1810429681,425
Nov-1898110291,370
Dec-188908761,384
Jan-197297801,329
Feb-19112011251,322
Mar-19110011211,304
Apr-19111311431,244
May-19104111181,174
Jun-199791216938
Jul-1910171217745

More information

Application volumes had been gradually decreasing throughout Q1 of FY 18/19, however, this has been increasing since July 2018. Since then, we have seen some of the highest numbers of applications received.

The increase in applications received has been due to regulation changes impacting heat pumps whereby applications submitted on or after the 22nd May 2018 require metering for performance.

Despite the increase in applications received, processing has also increased, meaning, after an initial increase, the queue remained relatively static. In June and July 2019, there was a focus on reducing the aged queue and a revised process for Metering & Monitoring Service Package (MMSP) applications, both of which led to a significant reduction in the queue.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows the number of Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Non-Domestic RHI

Data Table

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Aug-1852160983
Sep-1862114929
Oct-1893140887
Nov-1887157815
Dec-186492789
Jan-19107117775
Feb-1912194796
Mar-1992121762
Apr-196286739
May-1972103708
Jun-1983115676
Jul-1969107639

More information

There was a significant increase in applications received in June 2017 and then again in May 2018, following regulation changes. On both occasions, processing remained relatively static, which led to an increase in the queue.

Since then, applications received have reduced and remained stable, so the queue has gradually decreased. 

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Feed-In Tariffs: Applications received, processed and queue.

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows the combined number of Renewables Obligation Order Feed-In Tariffs (ROOFIT) and Communities and Schools Feed-In Tariffs (C&S FITs) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • FIT

Data Table

Feed-In Tariffs: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Aug-184786144
Sep-188538191
Oct-185480165
Nov-186150176
Dec-188447213
Jan-196789195
Feb-197134194
Mar-1944864634
Apr-191663616
May-1912310376
Jun-191344377
Jul-1921111349

More information

As anticipated, a significantly higher number of applications were received in the final month of the scheme, March 2019. The number received was higher than projected, with the majority of caps closed by 31 March 2019. This has led to a large increase in the queue.

A new triage approach to applications has improved the throughput of applications, but this continues to be refined due to the large number of preliminary applications received (in excess of 400). We are now looking at prioritising preliminary applications and converting to full applications and prioritising these based on the length of validity period on offer.

The efforts of this work can be seen in the large number of applications processed in May 2019.  This includes those refused on the basis of there being no space in the cap, or if the application was received after the closure date. This has also impacted the queue, which significantly reduced.

Of the remaining applications, a number are more complex, requiring additional work and, in some cases, audit, to confirm the evidence and subsequent accreditation. This means that these applications are taking longer to assess.

The above figures do not include the number of applications received for Community & School pre-applications where 1,673 were received in March 2019. We have simplified the process for pre-accreditation as far as we can and will be considering how to minimise the impact of these on ROOFIT application assessments.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows the number of Renewables Obligation (RO) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected. 

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • RO

Data Table

Renewables Obligation: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Aug-181877253
Sep-181626250
Oct-181930250
Nov-182136243
Dec-181318241
Jan-191017240
Feb-19110183
Mar-19320171
Apr-19013161
May-19119144
Jun-19114136
Jul-19134113

More information

The final grace period for RO closed on 31 March 2019. This means that we are now aware of all application numbers. However, there will continue to be applications "received" if, and when, applications move from dormant. Grace period requirements require us to assess more evidence and, as such, applications take longer to process. There has been a decrease in the RO queue during July due to the focus on applications with associated 2017/18 banked ROCs.

A revision to our reporting process means amendments are now captured separately, so this data refers only to applications only from April 2019 onwards. Prior to this, the figures included both applications and amendments.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows the number of Energy Company Obligation scheme measures we have received from energy suppliers and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of measures that are not currently approved or rejected. The queue often increases considerably when a number of measures are moved out of the ‘approved’ status and back into the queue for further investigation or amendment.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO

Data Table

Energy Company Obligation: Measures received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Aug-18 23,817 28,368 34,576
Sep-18 33,257 23,205 51,676
Oct-18 38,092 30,331 41,718
Nov-18 8,753 50,069 47,313
Dec-18 10,010 6,323 71,084
Jan-19 32,703 9,264 81,827
Feb-19 17,971 37,864 15,016
Mar-19 16,097 28,954 12,890
Apr-19 21,880 16,097 14,163
May-19 14,466 21,915 11,605
Jun-19 21,145 14,193 12,762
Jul-19 18,683 20,794 20,667

More information

The queue increased over Q2-3 of 2018, as suppliers notified increased volumes of measures to ensure compliance against obligations ahead of the closure of ECO2t. In November 2018, the number of measures received decreased significantly due to the closure of ECO2. As of March 2019, we will no longer be accepting ECO2 measures.

The first of ECO3 measures were received in December 2018 and the first processing of these took place in February 2019, at the end of the notification period. Early delivery measures had until the end of February 2019 to notify and were processed in March 2019.

In December 2018, the queue increased significantly because approximately 25,000 measures were moved from "approved" status due to Q6 monitoring. These have now been resolved.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

This chart shows the number of Warm Home Discount scheme proposals submitted for approval by obligated energy suppliers and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of scheme proposals received which have not yet been responded to.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • WHD

Data Table

Warm Home Discount: Schemes submitted for approval, processed and queue
SubmittedProcessedQueue
Aug-1815129
Sep-1812401
Oct-184240
Nov-18450
Dec-18606
Jan-19472
Feb-19340
Mar-19330
Apr-196153
May-199332
Jun-197263
Jul-1914324

More information

New WHD Regulations came into force on 15th August 2018 and, since then, the team have been focusing on responding to notifications within the statutory deadline, 20 working days. Scheme proposals have been responded to within the deadline, hence processing peaks are broadly in line with scheme peaks.

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Customer satisfaction scores

In May 2016, we launched a survey to measure our customers’ satisfaction after they applied to the GB Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI, Feed-In-Tariffs and Renewables Obligation schemes. We surveyed scheme applicants to get feedback on their application experience in order to help us understand how we could improve the experience for future applicants. We then rolled out surveys to cover more areas where we interact with scheme participants and, from April 2017, the overall score encompassed these areas.

From the feedback we received, we were able to identify and address issues raised by participants and make changes to our processes, where possible. Subsequent feedback now tends to raise issues we are already aware of but cannot address, due to legislative barriers or the requirement for significant investment.

In the last year, we have seen scheme closures and, in order to avoid survey fatigue, a decreasing volume of participants to survey. Due to this, our satisfaction scores are heavily reliant on Domestic RHI participants, which does not give a truly representative view of E-Serve. On the other schemes, there has been a reduction in the number of responses we receive, leading to significant fluctuation in the scores. This cannot be viewed as significant due to the potential for a large margin of error, which limits the conclusions and statistical significance that can be drawn from the results.

Given this, the decision has been made to cease all customer satisfaction surveys as it is no longer a reliable picture of customer opinion. 

Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Ofgem scheme administration: Customer satisfaction scores .

Source: Ofgem scheme customer satisfaction surveys.

This chart shows the customer satisfaction scores for Ofgem scheme administration as a whole as well as for the four main schemes that we administer on behalf of government: the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI), Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT).

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Customer satisfaction scores
MonthAll SchemesDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Jun-1869.80%70.80%20.00%50.00%
Jul-1874.70%80.00%39.40%0.00%50.00%
Aug-1881.90%83.70%62.50%
Sep-1873.50%75.20%52.90%
Oct-1873.40%75.40%42.90%
Nov-1863.90%62.60%50.00%90.00%
Dec-1870.50%72.60%34.60%
Jan-1984.90%85.70%43.80%
Feb-1980.90%81.60%20.00%
Mar-1971.40%73.80%38.40%
Apr-1977.20%77.40%0.00%
May-1977.90%77.90%100.00%

More information

E-Serve

We define satisfied customers as those who score their satisfaction 8, 9 or 10 out of 10, or for smaller surveys with a 5 point scale, those who rate themselves as ‘extremely satisfied’ or ‘somewhat satisfied’.

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) 

Over the last 12 months, our scores have remained high, well above our 60% target, with an average of 76.4%. One of the main reasons for our strong application process score is the ease of the process.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

Over the past 12 months, there has been significant fluctuation in the scores. Since the beginning of 2018, we have seen a significant drop in the number of responses we receive. Due to the reduction in response return rates, the fluctuation in scores should not be viewed as significant due to the potential for a large margin of error which limits the conclusions/statistical significance that can be drawn from the results.

The low score has been driven by the length of time it takes to process complex applications and the effort involved for the participant, as the complexities of the scheme rules require an in-depth understanding by customers, especially around the sustainability requirements. We will continue to focus on providing support and guidance to customers to support the efficient processing of all applications.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The RO accreditation surveys ceased in August 2018. The reason for this is that, prior to this, the surveys yielded a very low response rate, making it difficult to obtain a representative sample size. The scheme was only open to certain grace periods and is now closed, therefore, the number of new applications received were much lower than when we initiated surveys, which, again, has meant that obtaining enough responses for us to draw learnings from has become difficult. 

We continued with our other customer satisfaction scores that focus on the on-going obligations within the renewable electricity schemes to help inform the level of service we provided to scheme participants. During November 2018, we sent out the bi-annual ROC Issue Survey, which gave a result of 90% customer satisfaction. Overall, respondents were happy with the customer service they received. All respondents found the data submission process easy and also found it easy to use our Renewables and CHP register to transfer their ROCs. 

Feed-In Tariffs (FIT)  

As with the RO scheme, the FIT application surveys ceased in August 2018. Due to the capping mechanism, the number of applications to the FIT scheme were much lower than when the surveys were initiated and the scheme is now only open to certain grace periods. Similar to RO, this has meant obtaining enough responses for us to draw learnings from has been difficult, along with the low response rates, which has made it difficult to obtain a representative sample size.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration customer satisfaction surveys.

This chart shows how helpful customers found members of staff when answering their queries. Scores are provided for Ofgem scheme administration as a whole as well as the four main schemes that we administer on behalf of government: the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI), Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT).

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Helpfulness of staff in responding to queries
MonthAll SchemesDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Jun-1867.40%66.30%71.40%100.00%
Jul-1872.30%69.40%75.00%100.00%100.00%
Aug-1867.30%64.40%80.00%
Sep-1872.50%73.50%66.70%
Oct-1876.10%77.80%57.10%
Nov-1865.70%66.30%0.00%
Dec-1865.60%67.20%52.90%
Jan-1973.30%72.50%80.00%
Feb-1957.60%60.70%0.00%
Mar-1969.70%69.60%70.60%
Apr-1965.60%65.40%100.00%
May-1970.10%70.10%

More information

E-Serve

One of the key areas we measured as part of our customer satisfaction surveys is how helpful our staff are when answering customers' queries. On average, over the last 12 months, 68.6% of respondents rated our staff as ‘extremely helpful’ or ‘somewhat helpful’.

Our scores have remained well above target, which is a reflection of the difference our dedicated staff make to applicants, by providing them with the help and assistance they need to make their application.

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI)

Over the past 12 months we have scored consistently well in relation to the helpfulness of our staff. This is because, our enquiries team are able to adapt their knowledge and style of approach when dealing with different customers, helping to ensure that they meet their needs.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

Over the last 12 months, the volume of responses has been relatively low, therefore, the large fluctuations seen in the scores should not be viewed as significant due to the potential for a larger margin of error.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The RO accreditation surveys ceased in August 2018.

Feed-In Tariffs (FIT)

The FIT application surveys ceased in August 2018.

close

Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration customer satisfaction surveys.

This chart shows how useful customers found our guidance documents when making their application. Scores are provided for Ofgem scheme administration as a whole, as well as for the four main schemes that we administer on behalf of government: the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI), Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT).

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Usefulness of guidance documents
MonthAll SchemesDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Jun-1868.80%70.90%25.00%100.00%
Jul-1881.20%82.70%71.40%0.00%100.00%
Aug-1863.80%66.70%33.30%
Sep-1873.10%75.00%50.00%
Oct-1874.00%76.20%14.30%
Nov-1869.30%69.60%0.00%
Dec-1870.80%73.90%18.80%
Jan-1975.30%77.20%45.50%
Feb-1971.40%73.40%25.00%
Mar-1969.50%71.90%22.20%
Apr-1972.10%72.40%0.00%
May-1975.80%75.80%

More information

E-Serve

One of the key areas we measured as part of our customer satisfaction surveys is how useful customers find our guidance documents. In the early phase of surveying, across the schemes, we worked hard to simplify our guidance documents, reduce jargon and improve signposting to guidance materials on our website. This saw an upward trend in the number of respondents rating the usefulness of our guidance documents as ‘extremely helpful’ or ‘somewhat helpful’. Since then, there has been a consistent trend of over 70% of respondents finding our guidance documents useful which is very positive. 

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI)

On the whole, customers have constantly rated our guidance very strongly in terms of usefulness. A key reason for our consistent high scores is our use of an agile approach to guidance, which allows us to respond quickly to trends in enquiries and any feedback received. 

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

The large fluctuations within the satisfaction scores are, in part, due to the lower response volumes that have been received recently, which therefore provide a less representative view of customer satisfaction for the period in question.

The overall results for the last 12 months are below where we would like them to be, especially given that we have listened to both customers and colleagues and implemented changes suggested. For example, our policy team has used a guidance suggestions log to input suggested improvements from other members of the team. Our enquiries team has also had an important role, passing on feedback from conversations with customers to help us improve specific sections of the guidance. These changes have been grouped together and implemented at regular periods, often timed to coincide with scheduled updates. Other teams, such as our technical team, have also been crucial to identifying and reviewing these updates. We have also introduced more signposting for website users to help them find key documents, such as our guidance documents, more easily. In part, the reduction in results may be due to the change in the portfolio of technologies applying to the NDRHI which are of a more complex background and require an in-depth understanding of the regulations by customers.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The RO accreditation surveys ceased in August 2018.

Feed-In Tariffs (FITs)

The FIT application surveys ceased in August 2018.

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Publications and updates

  • Published: 10th Jun 2019
  • Guidance
  • 0 Associated documents
BEIS have introduced the Smart Export Guarantee (SEG). The SEG will be in force from 1 January 2020.

  • Published: 29th Jan 2016
  • Charts and data
  • 1 Associated documents
If you would like to find out more about the uptake of the schemes we deliver in Wales, you can view our E-Serve in Wales by Numbers 2015 booklet.

  • Published: 29th Jan 2016
  • Charts and data
  • 1 Associated documents
If you would like to find out more about the uptake of the schemes we deliver in Scotland, you can view our E-Serve in Scotland by Numbers 2015 booklet.