Environmental programmes: Ofgem’s role and delivery performance

Our role

Ofgem delivers renewable energy and social programmes on behalf of government. Our expertise lies in designing, setting up and delivering large scale programmes in the sustainable energy sector. These programmes are in fields as diverse as renewable heat, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel poverty.

We work with energy companies, consumer groups and other stakeholders, including the UK’s elected representatives, to make sure policy targets are met in the most economical and consumer conscious way possible.

We’re also working with a growing number of delivery partners across government, adding value to their operations by sharing our expertise.

Counter fraud

We take allegations of fraud very seriously. To find out how to report suspected fraud within an environmental or social scheme, or to learn more about our role in preventing fraud, please see our Counter Fraud section.

The schemes we administer

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI)

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive encourages the use of renewable heat.

The scheme is funded by HM Treasury and provides quarterly payments over seven years to homeowners who install eligible domestic renewable heat technologies. Only the owner of an eligible installation can apply for the scheme.

We’re responsible for administering this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and the Department for the Economy administers a separate domestic scheme in Northern Ireland.

domesticrhi@ofgem.gov.uk

Feed-in Tariff (FIT)

The Feed-in Tariff scheme encourages uptake of small-scale renewable low carbon electricity generation technologies.

The scheme requires FIT licensees (electricity suppliers) to make fixed tariff payments for electricity generated and exported to the network by accredited installations. The cost of the scheme is shared across all electricity suppliers.

Additional benefits are also available for community and school installations.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, ensuring compliance from electricity suppliers and reporting to the Secretary of State.

renewable@ofgem.gov.uk

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The Renewables Obligation is one of the main support schemes for large-scale renewable electricity generation in the UK. It puts an obligation on licensed electricity suppliers to source a proportion of their supply from renewables.

Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs) are issued to accredited generators for the renewable electricity they generate. These are then used by electricity suppliers to demonstrate they have met their obligation. If suppliers do not have sufficient ROCs to meet their obligations they must instead pay into a ‘buy-out’ fund. Once the compliance period has closed, this fund is redistributed to compliant suppliers.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Utility Regulator in Northern Ireland (UREGNI) through an Agency Services Agreement.

Our role is to accredit generating stations, issue certificates, ensure compliance by electricity suppliers and report annually.

renewable@ofgem.gov.uk

Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO)

The Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO) scheme aims to promote and increase the contribution of renewable energy sources to electricity production across the EU. It provides a common platform for the trade of renewable electricity between member states.

REGOs are certificates which demonstrate electricity has been generated from renewable sources. Their primary purpose is to allow suppliers to meet the Fuel Mix Disclosure condition in their supply license. This requires suppliers to let their customers, and potential customers, know where their electricity is generated from.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and also on behalf of UREGNI through an Agency Services Agreement.

cclandrego@ofgem.gov.uk

Climate Change Levy (CCL) exemption

The Climate Change Levy (CCL) is a tax on UK business energy use, charged at the time of supply. Electricity generated from certain renewable sources before 1 August 2015 was exempt from the CCL.

We administer a certification scheme on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs, which provides evidence for the operation of this tax exemption.

cclandrego@ofgem.gov.uk

Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

The Energy Company Obligation requires larger suppliers to deliver energy efficiency measures such as loft and wall insulation to domestic premises in Great Britain.

Suppliers’ obligations depend on their market share, and delivery of the obligation is market driven. Suppliers are not tied to their own customer base to meet their overall targets.

We administer this scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and reports to the Secretary of State on a monthly basis.

We provide guidance to energy suppliers and those in the supply chain to help them deliver measures that comply with the requirements of the obligation.

eco@ofgem.gov.uk

Warm Home Discount (WHD)

The Warm Home Discount obligates energy suppliers over a certain size to provide support to vulnerable customers in Great Britain.

Most support is provided through annual electricity rebates of £140 to customers in or at risk of fuel poverty. This can include low income pensioners and families with young children. Other support is provided through a mixture of initiatives such as free energy advice and help with clearing energy debts.

We administer the scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, ensuring energy suppliers meet their obligations and reporting annual outcomes to the Secretary of State.

whd@ofgem.gov.uk

Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR)

The Offtaker of Last Resort (OLR) is a scheme that enables eligible renewable generators to enter into a Backstop Power Purchase Agreement (BPPA) with a licensed supplier when they cannot get a standard Purchase Power Agreement through normal commercial avenues.  Eligible renewable generators will need to hold either a Contract for Difference or an Investment Contract.

We administers the scheme on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Our role is to assess generators’ eligibility, run OLR auctions and to share the costs of the scheme fairly across all electricity suppliers.

olr@ofgem.gov.uk

Our performance

Our data shows details of our performance against our three key indicators:

  • How quickly we respond to stakeholders.
  • How long payments and processing take.
  • The availability of our IT systems for scheme participants.

Scheme performance indicators

Every year E-Serve commits to upholding specific service levels for the GB Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI, Feed-In-Tariffs, Renewables Obligation, Energy Company Obligation and Warm Home Discount schemes. These are documented within the key performance indicators section of the Ofgem Forward Work Programme. Meeting or exceeding these indicators is important to us as we want to provide the best possible service to our customers.

Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Ofgem scheme administration: Maintaining system availability.

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows how well the schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'maintaining system availability' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. By 'system availability' we mean whether the IT systems that scheme participants use to apply or submit data were available to them to use. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Maintaining system availability
TargetDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In TariffsEnergy Company Obligation
Mar-2099%99.74%100.00%99.97%99.80%100.00%
Apr-2099%99.95%99.98%99.95%100.00%100.00%
May-2099%100.00%100.00%99.58%99.93%99.90%
Jun-2099%99.99%99.99%99.90%99.87%99.94%
Jul-2099%99.99%99.53%99.62%99.96%99.69%
Aug-2099%100.00%99.88%99.82%100.00%99.66%
Sep-2099%100.00%99.88%99.43%98.99%99.71%
Oct-2099%100.00%99.75%99.62%99.99%99.95%
Nov-2099%100.00%99.98%99.57%100.00%100.00%
Dec-2099%99.99%99.83%99.79%99.91%99.85%
Jan-2199%97.66%82.82%84.20%99.75%83.05%
Feb-2199%100.00%99.02%99.86%99.68%99.79%

More information

An Ofgem-wide server issue affected all systems in January. Physical parts failed and had to be replaced, causing significant downtime as new parts had to be ordered and installed before systems could then be restored. System availability has since returned to normal operation and within KPI In February-21.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows how well the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI) schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'responding to stakeholders' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI - responding to stakeholders
TargetDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHI
Mar-2090%99.6%64.1%
Apr-2080%98.1%82.3%
May-2080%95.9%93.3%
Jun-2080%99.0%98.6%
Jul-2080%99.6%99.1%
Aug-2080%99.5%99.2%
Sep-2080%98.8%99.4%
Oct-2080%99.1%98.4%
Nov-2080%99.3%97.2%
Dec-2080%98.8%98.5%
Jan-2180%97.7%97.9%
Feb-2180%96.1%99.2%

More information

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) 

Towards the end of 2019, the response rate dropped due to resourcing and time spent answering calls. We continue to actively manage our aged enquiry volume, which is dropping, although this impacts in the overall volumes being dealt with due to the time needed for these. Enquiry volumes continue to remain high while the phone service has been reduced due to Covid-19, however, despite this we have consistently exceeded our KPI.

 

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

The creation of the One Ofgem enquiries team has enabled us to flex resource across schemes to focus on priority areas. The team had been working with a decreased resource during 2019, which has negatively impacted performance. New resource has seen improvements in service levels recently, however there was a slight drop in March 2020, this can be attributed to a substantial increase of enquires as a result of Covid-19. Since this drop in March there has been consistent improvement in performance and we are now in line with our KPI.

 

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows how well the Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT) schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'responding to stakeholders' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Renewables Obligation and Feed-In Tariffs - responding to stakeholders
TargetRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Mar-2090%79.9%83.0%
Apr-2080%84.5%89.2%
May-2080%97.5%95.9%
Jun-2080%100.0%100.0%
Jul-2080%100.0%100.0%
Aug-2080%100.0%100.0%
Sep-2080%100.0%98.1%
Oct-2080%94.4%100.0%
Nov-2080%100.0%100.0%
Dec-2080%100.0%100.0%
Jan-2180%100.0%100.0%
Feb-2180%100.0%100.0%

More information

Renewables Obligation (RO)

In November 2019, we focused on answering phone calls and responding to emails before they hit 10 working days, which led to the number of emails over 10 working days building up and causing a negative impact on the KPI in December. Service levels have since returned to expected, which in turn is reducing queue lengths. However, there was a slight drop in March 2020, and this can be attributed to a substantial increase of enquires as a result of Covid-19. Since this drop in March, there has been consistent improvement in performance and we are now in line with our KPI.

 

Feed-In Tariffs (FITs)   

The response rate has been impacted by the high number of enquiries that were received preceding the closure of the FIT scheme on 31st March 2019. Cross-training is taking place in order to improve the resilience and response rates across all schemes. In August 2019, work focused on prioritising queries relating to Banked ROCs, which negatively impacted the response rates on FIT queries.  Several new team members joined in December 2019, and performance has improved as a result. There was a slight drop in March 2020 which can be attributed to a substantial increase of enquires as a result of Covid-19. Since this drop in March, there has been consistent improvement in performance and we are now in line with our KPI.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows how well the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Warm Home Discount (WHD) schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'responding to stakeholders' key performance indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO
  • WHD

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Energy Company Obligation and Warm Home Discount - responding to stakeholders
TargetWarm Home DiscountEnergy Company Obligation
Mar-2090%47.4%57.5%
Apr-2080%66.7%94.9%
May-2080%100.0%59.5%
Jun-2080%100.0%94.9%
Jul-2080%53.8%30.7%
Aug-2080%84.6%21.0%
Sep-2080%78.6%24.5%
Oct-2080%75.5%22.9%
Nov-2080%85.5%72.2%
Dec-2080%100.0%99.6%
Jan-2180%100.0%98.1%
Feb-2180%96.8%92.6%

More information

Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

In December 2019, the KPI dropped significantly as the team had to focus on clearing subject access requests (SARs) which have a statutory deadline, so enquiries took a lower priority. From May 2020, enquiries and SARs will be dealt with by separate teams which should mean that the volumes are steadier and fluctuate less. Resource from internal teams have helped clear a large part of the aged queue in May. However, we have seen a significant increase in emails due to transition in team and enquiries around the Green Home Grant, which have had an impact on our KPI for July and August. September has seen another spike in queries on the Green Home Grant and general enquiries with installer companies returning to work and engaging with householders, which is in line with the increase we have seen in ECO SAR cases. Additional resource was allocated in November which has cleared all outstanding emails. The queue is now up to date and emails are being responded to within KPI.

 

Warm Home Discount (WHD)

KPIs slipped in February 2020 as we focussed on clearing older emails and additionally a senior member of staff left the team. In addition, there was a focus on Subject Access Requests as these have a statutory deadline. This had an impact on general enquires, however separate teams have been created which has led to the improvement in meeting our SLA. From then on performance has been more consistent with the exception of July where there was a dip due to training of new staff. The winter period has led to additional queries on WHD from consumers, however we are in line with our KPI.

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Ofgem scheme administration: Payments and processing.

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows how well the schemes we administer on behalf of government are performing against our 'payments and processing' Key Performance Indicator (KPI) targets. These targets form part of the commitments we made to customers within Ofgem’s Forward Work Programme.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Payments and processing
Non-Domestic RHI targetOther schemes targetDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In TariffsEnergy Company Obligation
Mar-2090%95%99.1%90.8%98.6%100.0%100.0%
Apr-2090%95%98.6%95.7%96.3%100.0%100.0%
May-2090%95%99.2%93.1%99.8%100.0%100.0%
Jun-2090%95%98.6%90.8%97.5%100.0%100.0%
Jul-2090%95%99.6%96.2%99.4%100.0%100.0%
Aug-2090%95%99.1%91.0%97.9%100.0%100.0%
Sep-2090%95%99.4%94.7%99.3%100.0%100.0%
Oct-2090%95%95.2%94.7%99.3%100.0%100.0%
Nov-2090%95%97.6%94.6%99.9%100.0%100.0%
Dec-2090%95%98.7%94.4%96.5%100.0%100.0%
Jan-2190%95%99.0%96.8%99.6%100.0%46.8%
Feb-2190%95%92.7%92.9%99.4%100.0%100.0%

More information

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) 

We have consistently achieved our ‘Payments and processing’ KPI FY20-21 target of making 95% of payments within 30 working days. However, we are below KPI in February-21 due to a large number of payments being suspended in January. The majority of these payments have been unsuspended and we aim to fall back in line with KPI in the next month. 

 

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

We have consistently achieved our ‘Payments and processing’ KPI FY20-21 target of making 90% of payments within 40 working days.

 

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The year to date processing figure remains above the KPI target of issuing 95% of ROCs within 17 working days (Apr-Jun) and 12 working days (Jul-Mar).

 

Feed-In Tariffs (FIT) 

Our levelisation team has consistently exceeded our ‘Payments and processing’ KPI target of completing 95% of the quarterly levelisation process within 22 working days.

 

Energy Company Obligation (ECO) 

We have consistently met our KPI target ‘Payments and processing’ KPI target of processing 95% of measures submitted within the calendar month. We are committed to processing all measures where possible by working with suppliers to ensure notifications are of good quality. This has led not only to us achieving our KPI but also to us continuously improving our performance.

 

An Ofgem-wide system outage occurred in January which caused ECO register issues, leading to a batch of measures not being processed. Multiple processing rounds were completed in February and we are now back in line with KPI. 

 

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Scheme applications and queues

We track and report on the number of applications we receive and process in a month, as well as the overall length of the queue for the GB Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI, Feed-In-Tariffs, Renewables Obligation, Energy Company Obligation and Warm Home Discount schemes. This helps to show the volume of applications that we are dealing with. It also shows things such as where there have been spikes in applications, which may impact how quickly we are able to process them.

Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows the number of Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI

Data Table

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Mar-2012661239600
Apr-20932997539
May-20755713574
Jun-20776855502
Jul-2010601073496
Aug-201014899605
Sep-201011997621
Oct-2017661671722
Nov-2016451701671
Dec-2013411290711
Jan-2114881330870
Feb-2116371541991

More information

Since June 2019, we have given increased focus to reducing the aged queue. Despite this focus, we are balancing processing aged applications with new-ins. There is a revised process for Metering & Monitoring Service Package (MMSP) applications and continuous improvement deployments have been implemented to allow faster processing of these applications.

Application volumes reduced in April 2020 as a result of Covid-19 which allowed time to concentrate on processing some of the older more complex applications. Volumes began gradually picking up from June due to Covid-19 restrictions easing. 

October 2020 saw a large increase in the volume of applications processed as a result of an increase in applications received (1766 submissions – highest in any month of the scheme). This is mainly as a result of the completion of migrations of the EPC registers which had meant that the third party provider had taken these offline over the end of September and early October. Application volumes have gradually reduced since the migration, partially due to the festive period, however have returned to high and above forecast levels from January 2021.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows the number of Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Non-Domestic RHI

Data Table

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Mar-20142116456
Apr-204694408
May-208595396
Jun-207994380
Jul-207581367
Aug-205894339
Sep-207490333
Oct-208987338
Nov-2015089406
Dec-209093405
Jan-21128110438
Feb-21231154535

More information

Application processing has been consistently high. However, an expected increase in application processing did not occur in January 2020 due to a temporary reduction in headcount. There was a spike in applications received in March 2020, this can be attributed the tariff degression, in relation to large GSHPs. This spike has led to a temporary increase in the queue.

An expected drop in applications in April 2020 allowed the team to focus on existing applications and as a result the queue has decreased, and this trend has continued throughout 2020. 

November 2020 has seen an increase of new applications, and hence larger queue length, which will continue as scheme closure approaches. As expected the number of applications received in February 2021 increased significantly and we expect this to be the same in March 2021. 

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Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Feed-In Tariffs: Applications received, processed and queue.

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows the combined number of Renewables Obligation Order Feed-In Tariffs (ROOFIT) and Communities and Schools Feed-In Tariffs (C&S FITs) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • FIT

Data Table

Feed-In Tariffs: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Mar-201143189
Apr-20193163
May-20258145
Jun-20572114
Jul-20239106
Aug-20336106
Sep-2042997
Oct-2064291
Nov-2082895
Dec-20740165
Jan-21233157
Feb-21233148

More information

As anticipated, a significantly higher number of applications were received in the final month of the scheme, March 2019. The number received was higher than projected, with the majority of caps closed by 31 March 2019. This has led to a large increase in the queue. However a number of these were dealt with in May 2019 when those out with the caps queue or received late were refused.  

Following this, a new triage approach to valid applications has improved processing time even where these are more complex, requiring additional work and, in some cases, audit, to confirm the evidence and subsequent accreditation. This has led to a continuing reduction in the queue length.

The above figures do not include the number of applications received for Community & School pre-applications (1,673 received in March 2019). All valid applications have now been dealt with.

The application queue has risen in December as this figure now includes those on hold to give a true reflection of the application volume. An application can be on hold, for example, if they had a substantial period until validity expiry. 

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows the number of Renewables Obligation (RO) scheme applications we have received and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of applications received which have not yet been approved or rejected. 

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • RO

Data Table

Renewables Obligation: Applications received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Mar-200880
Apr-2011375
May-200569
Jun-200859
Jul-202562
Aug-2021252
Sep-200156
Oct-200558
Nov-200651
Dec-200645
Jan-211148
Feb-210751

More information

The final grace period for RO closed on 31 March 2019.  This means that we are now aware of all application numbers. However, there will continue to be applications "received" if, and when, applications move from dormant.  The dormancy project is now underway which will see the end of dormant applications over the coming months.

Due to the deadline for Banked ROCs from 2017-18 at the end of August 2019, applications associated with these were prioritised and this focused work led to a decrease in the queue in July and August 2019. The drop in numbers processed since then is the result of the simpler applications being processed as part of the Banked ROCs work, leaving the most complex applications in the queue, which take longer to process. A full assessment of the complete queue has been carried out with a view to finding any common issues, allowing these applications to be moved to a decision. The assessment shows that only 40% of the applications are in active review, with the majority of the remainder with Audit and Compliance.  Work is now underway to (i) where possible, progress these applications back to the Applications team, or (ii) work across teams in order to progress the applications. A new joint approach to RO audits has been agreed which will see the time taken for Audit reduce substantially and the application returning to assessment.

In addition, a number of technical assessment have been completed and we are awaiting finalisation of the FMS assessment.  As soon as this is available, there are a number of applications which will be accredited.

A revision to our reporting process means amendments are now captured separately, so this data refers only to applications only from April 2019 onwards. Prior to this, the figures included both applications and amendments. 

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows the number of Energy Company Obligation scheme measures we have received from energy suppliers and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of measures that are not currently approved or rejected. The queue often increases considerably when a number of measures are moved out of the ‘approved’ status and back into the queue for further investigation or amendment.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • ECO

Data Table

Energy Company Obligation: Measures received, processed and queue
ReceivedProcessedQueue
Mar-20 25,221 25,640 53,949
Apr-20 28,439 25,221 63,942
May-20 28,955 26,475 69,570
Jun-20 23,981 23,249 58,114
Jul-20 37,135 25,603 56,203
Aug-20 33,105 37,009 61,322
Sep-20 40,144 35,893 62,127
Oct-20 45,995 52,847 63,250
Nov-20 62,532 57,488 67,406
Dec-20 42,823 57,490 69,730
Jan-21 67,215 49,197 95,955
Feb-21 53,073 50,894 80,598

More information

Queue volumes can appear volatile, however this is due to improvements in the approvals process where the statuses of measures can change and re-enter queues for re-evaluation. The increase demonstrates the increased effectiveness of the approvals process.

Measures received in February-19 decreased significantly, likely due to new Trustmark installation standards which meant that ECO installers must be registered with them. It was expected that this would return to normal as installers adjust to the changes, however with Covid-19, delivery was reduced over the spring and summer months. Volumes have since returned to pre-covid levels and continue to increase month on month. The queue has been increasing as a result of notification errors around the new Trustmark information that is required, this will start to reduce as suppliers adjust to including the correct information.

The Ofgem-wide server downtime in January-21 resulted in a buildup of measures that could not be processed in-month. Hence, these measures were processed in February, causing a significant reduction in the queue.  

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration.

Information correct as of: 01 March 2021

This chart shows the number of Warm Home Discount scheme proposals submitted for approval by obligated energy suppliers and how many we are processing by month. It also shows the overall size of the queue for the scheme. By queue we mean the number of scheme proposals received which have not yet been responded to.

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • WHD

Data Table

Warm Home Discount: Schemes submitted for approval, processed and queue
SubmittedProcessedQueueSchemes processed within 20 WD
Mar-20243100.0%
Apr-20353100.0%
May-20443100.0%
Jun-20987100.0%
Jul-207133100.0%
Aug-2011144100.0%
Sep-208142100.0%
Oct-20793100.0%
Nov-20562100.0%
Dec-20563100.0%
Jan-21471100.0%
Feb-21202100.0%

More information

New WHD Regulations came into force on 15th August 2018 and, since then, the team have been focusing on responding to notifications within the statutory deadline of 20 working days. Scheme proposals have been responded to within the deadline, hence processing peaks are broadly in line with scheme peaks. The first SY11 submissions have been received in February-21.

We have consistently met our ‘Responding to stakeholders’ KPI target. This means that we've responded to 100% of Warm Home Discount scheme proposals submitted for approval by obligated energy suppliers within 20 days. 

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Customer satisfaction scores

In May 2016, we launched a survey to measure our customers’ satisfaction after they applied to the GB Domestic and Non-Domestic RHI, Feed-In-Tariffs and Renewables Obligation schemes. We surveyed scheme applicants to get feedback on their application experience in order to help us understand how we could improve the experience for future applicants. We then rolled out surveys to cover more areas where we interact with scheme participants and, from April 2017, the overall score encompassed these areas.

From the feedback we received, we were able to identify and address issues raised by participants and make changes to our processes, where possible. Subsequent feedback now tends to raise issues we are already aware of but cannot address, due to legislative barriers or the requirement for significant investment.

In the last year, we have seen scheme closures and, in order to avoid survey fatigue, a decreasing volume of participants to survey. Due to this, our satisfaction scores are heavily reliant on Domestic RHI participants, which does not give a truly representative view of E-Serve. On the other schemes, there has been a reduction in the number of responses we receive, leading to significant fluctuation in the scores. This cannot be viewed as significant due to the potential for a large margin of error, which limits the conclusions and statistical significance that can be drawn from the results.

Given this, the decision has been made to cease all customer satisfaction surveys as it is no longer a reliable picture of customer opinion. 

Chart

Javascript is required to render chart Ofgem scheme administration: Customer satisfaction scores .

Source: Ofgem scheme customer satisfaction surveys.

This chart shows the customer satisfaction scores for Ofgem scheme administration as a whole as well as for the four main schemes that we administer on behalf of government: the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI), Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT).

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Customer satisfaction scores
MonthAll SchemesDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Jun-1869.80%70.80%20.00%50.00%
Jul-1874.70%80.00%39.40%0.00%50.00%
Aug-1881.90%83.70%62.50%
Sep-1873.50%75.20%52.90%
Oct-1873.40%75.40%42.90%
Nov-1863.90%62.60%50.00%90.00%
Dec-1870.50%72.60%34.60%
Jan-1984.90%85.70%43.80%
Feb-1980.90%81.60%20.00%
Mar-1971.40%73.80%38.40%
Apr-1977.20%77.40%0.00%
May-1977.90%77.90%100.00%

More information

E-Serve

We define satisfied customers as those who score their satisfaction 8, 9 or 10 out of 10, or for smaller surveys with a 5 point scale, those who rate themselves as ‘extremely satisfied’ or ‘somewhat satisfied’.

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI) 

Over the last 12 months, our scores have remained high, well above our 60% target, with an average of 76.4%. One of the main reasons for our strong application process score is the ease of the process.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

Over the past 12 months, there has been significant fluctuation in the scores. Since the beginning of 2018, we have seen a significant drop in the number of responses we receive. Due to the reduction in response return rates, the fluctuation in scores should not be viewed as significant due to the potential for a large margin of error which limits the conclusions/statistical significance that can be drawn from the results.

The low score has been driven by the length of time it takes to process complex applications and the effort involved for the participant, as the complexities of the scheme rules require an in-depth understanding by customers, especially around the sustainability requirements. We will continue to focus on providing support and guidance to customers to support the efficient processing of all applications.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The RO accreditation surveys ceased in August 2018. The reason for this is that, prior to this, the surveys yielded a very low response rate, making it difficult to obtain a representative sample size. The scheme was only open to certain grace periods and is now closed, therefore, the number of new applications received were much lower than when we initiated surveys, which, again, has meant that obtaining enough responses for us to draw learnings from has become difficult. 

We continued with our other customer satisfaction scores that focus on the on-going obligations within the renewable electricity schemes to help inform the level of service we provided to scheme participants. During November 2018, we sent out the bi-annual ROC Issue Survey, which gave a result of 90% customer satisfaction. Overall, respondents were happy with the customer service they received. All respondents found the data submission process easy and also found it easy to use our Renewables and CHP register to transfer their ROCs. 

Feed-In Tariffs (FIT)  

As with the RO scheme, the FIT application surveys ceased in August 2018. Due to the capping mechanism, the number of applications to the FIT scheme were much lower than when the surveys were initiated and the scheme is now only open to certain grace periods. Similar to RO, this has meant obtaining enough responses for us to draw learnings from has been difficult, along with the low response rates, which has made it difficult to obtain a representative sample size.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration customer satisfaction surveys.

This chart shows how helpful customers found members of staff when answering their queries. Scores are provided for Ofgem scheme administration as a whole as well as the four main schemes that we administer on behalf of government: the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI), Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT).

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Helpfulness of staff in responding to queries
MonthAll SchemesDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Jun-1867.40%66.30%71.40%100.00%
Jul-1872.30%69.40%75.00%100.00%100.00%
Aug-1867.30%64.40%80.00%
Sep-1872.50%73.50%66.70%
Oct-1876.10%77.80%57.10%
Nov-1865.70%66.30%0.00%
Dec-1865.60%67.20%52.90%
Jan-1973.30%72.50%80.00%
Feb-1957.60%60.70%0.00%
Mar-1969.70%69.60%70.60%
Apr-1965.60%65.40%100.00%
May-1970.10%70.10%

More information

E-Serve

One of the key areas we measured as part of our customer satisfaction surveys is how helpful our staff are when answering customers' queries. On average, over the last 12 months, 68.6% of respondents rated our staff as ‘extremely helpful’ or ‘somewhat helpful’.

Our scores have remained well above target, which is a reflection of the difference our dedicated staff make to applicants, by providing them with the help and assistance they need to make their application.

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI)

Over the past 12 months we have scored consistently well in relation to the helpfulness of our staff. This is because, our enquiries team are able to adapt their knowledge and style of approach when dealing with different customers, helping to ensure that they meet their needs.

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

Over the last 12 months, the volume of responses has been relatively low, therefore, the large fluctuations seen in the scores should not be viewed as significant due to the potential for a larger margin of error.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The RO accreditation surveys ceased in August 2018.

Feed-In Tariffs (FIT)

The FIT application surveys ceased in August 2018.

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Chart

Source: Ofgem scheme administration customer satisfaction surveys.

This chart shows how useful customers found our guidance documents when making their application. Scores are provided for Ofgem scheme administration as a whole, as well as for the four main schemes that we administer on behalf of government: the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI), Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI), Renewables Obligation (RO) and Feed-In Tariffs (FIT).

Policy Areas:

  • Environmental programmes
  • Domestic RHI
  • Non-Domestic RHI
  • FIT
  • RO

Data Table

Ofgem scheme administration: Usefulness of guidance documents
MonthAll SchemesDomestic RHINon-Domestic RHIRenewables ObligationFeed-In Tariffs
Jun-1868.80%70.90%25.00%100.00%
Jul-1881.20%82.70%71.40%0.00%100.00%
Aug-1863.80%66.70%33.30%
Sep-1873.10%75.00%50.00%
Oct-1874.00%76.20%14.30%
Nov-1869.30%69.60%0.00%
Dec-1870.80%73.90%18.80%
Jan-1975.30%77.20%45.50%
Feb-1971.40%73.40%25.00%
Mar-1969.50%71.90%22.20%
Apr-1972.10%72.40%0.00%
May-1975.80%75.80%

More information

E-Serve

One of the key areas we measured as part of our customer satisfaction surveys is how useful customers find our guidance documents. In the early phase of surveying, across the schemes, we worked hard to simplify our guidance documents, reduce jargon and improve signposting to guidance materials on our website. This saw an upward trend in the number of respondents rating the usefulness of our guidance documents as ‘extremely helpful’ or ‘somewhat helpful’. Since then, there has been a consistent trend of over 70% of respondents finding our guidance documents useful which is very positive. 

Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Domestic RHI)

On the whole, customers have constantly rated our guidance very strongly in terms of usefulness. A key reason for our consistent high scores is our use of an agile approach to guidance, which allows us to respond quickly to trends in enquiries and any feedback received. 

Non-Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (Non-Domestic RHI)

The large fluctuations within the satisfaction scores are, in part, due to the lower response volumes that have been received recently, which therefore provide a less representative view of customer satisfaction for the period in question.

The overall results for the last 12 months are below where we would like them to be, especially given that we have listened to both customers and colleagues and implemented changes suggested. For example, our policy team has used a guidance suggestions log to input suggested improvements from other members of the team. Our enquiries team has also had an important role, passing on feedback from conversations with customers to help us improve specific sections of the guidance. These changes have been grouped together and implemented at regular periods, often timed to coincide with scheduled updates. Other teams, such as our technical team, have also been crucial to identifying and reviewing these updates. We have also introduced more signposting for website users to help them find key documents, such as our guidance documents, more easily. In part, the reduction in results may be due to the change in the portfolio of technologies applying to the NDRHI which are of a more complex background and require an in-depth understanding of the regulations by customers.

Renewables Obligation (RO)

The RO accreditation surveys ceased in August 2018.

Feed-In Tariffs (FITs)

The FIT application surveys ceased in August 2018.

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  • Open letters and correspondence
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If you would like to find out more about the uptake of the schemes we deliver in Wales, you can view our E-Serve in Wales by Numbers 2015 booklet.

  • Published: 29th Jan 2016
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If you would like to find out more about the uptake of the schemes we deliver in Scotland, you can view our E-Serve in Scotland by Numbers 2015 booklet.